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Auster Aiglet Trainer

The Auster Aiglet Trainer was the company's first fully aerobatic aircraft, and of the 70 built most were exported. In a non-aerobatic role it could carry four people.

Auster Aiglet Trainer

Comments
Barry, 15.06.2016

What we have here is a development of the J/5 Autocar and has absolutely nothing to do with the post war J/1 Aiglet.
The J/5G Aiglet featured an all new wing and was stressed for aerobatics flying for the first time on the 2nd June 1951. The production ran to 77 and it was used by private individuals and flying clubs but 15 went to the Pakistan Air Force (see top photo), 14 to the Iran Civil Aviation Club, and 2 to the Lebanese Air Force.

Crew 2/3

Power plant 1 x 130 h.p de Havilland Gypsy Major 1 inverted four cylinder air cooled engine

Span 32'0" Length 23'2" Height 8'3" Wing area 164 sq ft
Empty weight 1,323 lb Gross weight 2,200 lb

Max speed 127 mph Cruising speed 110 mph Range 275 miles
Service ceiling 12,500 ft

B,J,Cross., 13.10.2013

I wonder why the Auster V has not been given a spot. The Lycoming engine was OK. Am I the only one with memories of No(V) ????.

Tim Stevens, 02.06.2013

G AMRL should fly again this year again It has not flown since the 70s but let's hope this will be a good year for her after a very long rebuild

Noirman Brock, 14.04.2013

I too learnt to fly in G-AMRL wit the BSFC. John Hill was CFI and Stan Clark assistant instructor, the members did the maintenance under the watchful eyes of our engineer Noel Roper and I was Secretary. Yes, it was happy days at 1/15/0 an hour in 1962

Noirman Brock, 14.04.2013

I too learnt to fly in G-AMRL wit the BSFC. John Hill was CFI and Stan Clark assistant instructor, the members did the maintenance under the watchful eyes of our engineer Noel Roper and I was Secretary. Yes, it was happy days at 1/15/0 an hour in 1962

Dave Berry, 04.02.2013

Auster Aiglet G-AMRL was the first light aircraft I flew in, and I did my first solo in it. It was owned by the Bristol Siddeley Flying Group based at Baginton(Coventry).
The instructor was Geoff Burchell-Crookes and he also introduced me to aerobatics in it. Happy Days!

Peter Weston-Webb, 06.09.2012

My father owned one of these aircraft in the 50's, and made fame by flying day old chicks from the hatchery to our poultry farm, which minimised the mortality rate. He also used to fly it complete with two small passengers and a gun dog, to go shooting. Many stories

Pete,, 15.05.2012

The Auster Aiglet was the first plane I ever flew in. My brother bought me a flight in 1950 for my 15th. birthday. It was owned by a Mr Rumbles at Luton airport with the registration G-AJEJ. The runway was grass at that time and he even let me handle the controls for a while when we were at a safe altitude.
What amazes me is that I can clearly remember these details sixty years later, when today I can't remember what I went into the garage for.

Geoff Royle, 10.05.2012

Just after WWII grandmother who had never flown treated us both to our first flight by Auster Aiglet which took in Blackpool Tower as a kind of pylon ! There were only two seats so I had to sit in the back on a pile of maroon Royal Mail sacks. I think as a result I spent most of my working life at A.V.Roe, Woodford.

M. Sami Mullick, 01.01.2011

As a trainee pilot I flew a couple of hours on Auster Aiglet at Lahoe Flying Club in 1962. Unfortunately this aircraft crashed during aerobatic loop manouvre when it's right wing came off. Both the instructor Mr. Rauf and trainee Mr. Tony Taiwari were killed. Guess how much was I paying. Just one Dollar per hour under govt subsidy.

Jaqui Clark, 07.05.2010

Hi Robert - The Auster was not related to the Cessna in any way. The Grand daddy of the Auster design was in fact the 1940's Taylorcraft.

Robert Osborn, 05.05.2010

Was this a take off on the Cessna O-1. Did the UK have a lic. to build this aircraft if, in fact, it was a similar model to the Cessna?

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