Fokker Dr.I
1917
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Fokker Dr.I

Made famous as the red-painted mount of Baron Manfred von Richthofen and his Flying Circus at the time of his greatest success - and his death - the Fokker Dr.I (the 'Dr' denoting Dreidecker, or triplane) was introduced into service in October 1917. Although the aircraft was extremely manoeuvrable, the Dr.I was already outclassed by a new generation of fighter biplanes, and it was consequently never used in large numbers. Indeed, the fact that the Dr.I achieved success in air combat was due more to the skill of the experienced pilots who flew it, rather than the design itself.


Specification 
 ENGINE1 x 110hp Oberursel Ur11 9-cylinder rotary engine
 WEIGHTS
    Take-off weight586 kg1292 lb
 DIMENSIONS
    Wingspan7.19 m24 ft 7 in
    Length5.77 m19 ft 11 in
    Height2.95 m10 ft 8 in
 PERFORMANCE
    Max. speed185 km/h115 mph
    Ceiling6100 m20000 ft
 ARMAMENT2 x 7.92mm machine guns

Comments
Joe, 10.12.2017

The top wing was more suseptable to failure no doubt because it was a full span wing and set at a slightly higher incidence angle than the other wings. I can't imagine that the four center supports would have been sufficient. (My source is having been an aircraft design and performance engineer for 30 years.)

Robert, 06.02.2015

I have one, fly's great !

Mike Michigan, 28.12.2012

The struts were necessary to control wing "flutter"...not sructural, per se, but needed.

Jim Glover, 23.03.2012

The Dr 1 was a pretty poor copy of the Sopwith tripe, the Fokker organisation didn't have an available engine big enough for a true copy, and they didn't want to build an airframe requiring that much manpower. The bird they did build was prone to fall apart due to bad glue joints on the winter wet western front. When Gonterman was killed by one falling apart in the air, they were withdrawn from service except for "specials" with the problems corrected handed to top pilots, Aces like Goering, Richthofen, Udet, all had their own Dr-1s to play with when their albatri were down for service. they kept them to the end. For them, the albatros was replaced with the D-7 when it became available.

Tricky Loopsy, 19.12.2011

Manfred Von Richthofen (Red Baron) rules, but...
...medals for kill 80 innocent peoples, is a face of f*cking child with wings and a machine gun!!!!!

Rick, 26.05.2010

200 years from now gentlemen, someone will be researching this aircraft and find this post on the archives of the "ancient" internet and wonder which of you is correct? sources men, sources, please.

geoff, 20.08.2008

The myth of the struts not being needed is just that. in testing Fokker found the upper wing prone to vibration (flutter). The struts were added to prevent this. At least two fatalities occured asa result of the upper wing breaking in flight, also the fabric on anumber of aircraft came adrift in flight. Fokker claimed this was the result of poor factory workmanship.In fact NACA investigations in the 1920's showed that most lift and stress on a triplane cellule was taken by the upper wing. An american (USA)replica aircraft has a tested stall speed of between 40-45mph, which would seem to be higher than the quoted 50km/h

Dave Settle, 06.10.2007

I am looking for blueprints for WW1 airfraft. Any information on how I may obtain any would be appreciated. Dave Settle

Tim, 08.08.2007

Lt.Werner Voss could INDUCE a flat spin in his Dr. I to drop him
below and behind a pursuing fighter, pull up, and shoot the underside out of the enemy's craft. It is estimated this little gem had a stall speed of 50kph> ! When initially shown to German High Command, it was criticized for a lack of outer wing struts. Anthony
Fokker, knowing that the aircraft did not need these struts, simply
installed a pair cosmetically. The High Command bought the ruse, and Fokker received the contract.

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