Yokosuka P1Y Ginga / Francis
1943
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Yokosuka P1Y Ginga / Francis

Requiring a fast medium bomber for dive-bombing, low-altitude bombing or torpedo attack, the Imperial Japanese Navy instructed the Yokosuka First Naval Air Technical Arsenal in 1940 to begin design of such an aircraft. The resulting Yokosuka P1Y prototype flown in August 1943 was a mid-wing, all-metal monoplane, powered by two Nakajima NK9B Homare 11 radial engines. Its performance was satisfactory, but the P1Y suffered from maintenance problems that plagued its service life. All remedial attempts failed, delaying until early 1945 the entry into service of the Navy Bomber Ginga Model 11. Production totalled 1098, built by Kawanishi (96) and Nakajima (1002), and if there had been adequate manpower to service these aircraft before each operational sortie they would have proved formidable adversaries. This was not possible and as a result the Ginga (Milky Way), allocated the Allied codename 'Francis', was tried unsuccessfully in a variety of alternative roles; its brief operational life of only six months was terminated by the end of the Pacific war.

Yokosuka P1Y Ginga / Francis


Specification 
 MODELP1Y1
 CREW3
 ENGINE2 x Nakajima "Homare-21", 1370kW
 WEIGHTS
    Take-off weight10500 kg23149 lb
    Empty weight7265 kg16017 lb
 DIMENSIONS
    Wingspan20.0 m66 ft 7 in
    Length15.0 m49 ft 3 in
    Height4.3 m14 ft 1 in
    Wing area55.0 m2592.01 sq ft
 PERFORMANCE
    Max. speed550 km/h342 mph
    Cruise speed380 km/h236 mph
    Ceiling9400 m30850 ft
    Range w/max.fuel4650 km2889 miles
    Range w/max.payload1900 km1181 miles
 ARMAMENT2 x 20mm cannons, 1000kg of bombs

3-View 
Yokosuka P1Y Ginga / FrancisA three-view drawing (752 x 985)

Comments
Barry, 20.06.2012

Fitted out as a night fighter the Ginga featured a 20mm nose cannon and two canted upward firing 20mm cannon similar to the German "Shrage Musik" system. However, the whole programme was plagued by poor matainence and poorly trained recruits and so any success that may have been aspired to was only transitory. By the time it showed up the USAAF was bombing the homeland to a pulp and the USN, through it's submarine force, had laid siege to Japan that raw materials were becoming more and more difficult to come by.
One last comment the Frances was "the successor to the Betty", are you sure?

David Stubblebine, dstub=hotmail.com, 08.08.2011

This page identifies the Allied Code Name for the P1Y Ginga as “Francis.” This is, of course, incorrect. Allied Code names used men’s names for fighters and women’s names for bombers so the correct code name for the P1Y was the “Frances.”

paidui, 20.06.2011

I read an account by a youngster fresh from Bomber School being converted onto Gingas...couldn't believe his luck!! Flew straight to his mum's house for a fly over! He survived the war to have bragging rights about his time on Gingas!

, poloralphlauren=aol.com, 20.06.2011

Yokosuka P1Y Ginga / Francis
1943

DebtMan, na=32.mx, 01.10.2010

The Ginga was the successor of the Betty.Despite of that,the Betty was more frequent used and the Ginga was only limited use.Was operated as torpedo-bomber and mid-bomber.In 1944-mid,few Gingas was converted in night fighters,but was so few effective and due to that,was new converted in bombers.In the closing stages of the war,the Ginga was used as kamikaze and launcher of MXY7

Mike Dunne, hotideas=hotmail.com, 18.03.2010

What a fabulous bit of kit this bomber was! Imagine young sprog pilots being posted to fly them! Bugger the consequences...just let me fly the thing!

I read an account by a youngster fresh from Bomber School being converted onto Gingas...couldn't believe his luck!! Flew straight to his mum's house for a fly over! He survived the war to have bragging rights about his time on Gingas!

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