Beriev Be-10
1956
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Beriev Be-10

The Beriev Be-10 'Mallow' has the distinction of being the only turbojet-powered flying-boat in the world to have attained true production status. Developed from the R-1, it flew for the first time on 20 July 1956 and was first seen in public on the 1961 Soviet Aviation Day, when four of the type flew past in formation. During that summer, and under the designation M-10, the type established no fewer than 12 world class records. Outstanding among them were a speed record over a 15/25km course of 912km/h, piloted by Nikolai Andrievskii; a speed of 875.86km/h over a 1000km closed circuit with a payload of 5000kg; and an altitude record of 12733m with a 10000kg payload, the latter two records attained with Georgi Buryanov at the controls. The all-metal Be-10 was a high-wing monoplane with sharply sweptback wings; these had considerable anhedral, and incorporated two wing fences and a fixed wing-tip stabilising float on each wing. Armament comprised two 23mm NS-23 cannon in the nose, plus two more operated under radar control in a tail barbette.

Beriev Be-10


Specification 
 ENGINE2 x Lyul'ka AL-7PB turbojets, 6500kg each
 WEIGHTS
    Take-off weight46500 kg102515 lb
    Empty weight24100 kg53132 lb
 DIMENSIONS
    Wingspan22.3 m73 ft 2 in
    Length31.1 m102 ft 0 in
    Wing area111.8 m21203.40 sq ft
 PERFORMANCE
    Max. speed912 km/h567 mph
    Ceiling14962 m49100 ft
    Range4800 km2983 miles
 ARMAMENT4 x 23mm cannon, 2000kg of weapons

3-View 
Beriev Be-10A three-view drawing (800 x 448)

Beriev Be-10

Comments
bombardier, 06.07.2011

Imagine a group of these fitted with anti-ship missiles.

Cliff O'Hearne, 09.04.2010

The Martin P6M, also developed in the 1950s, was another early jet powered hull aircraft. It too had an anhedral wing with wingtip floats. But it was a much higher performance plane. It was transonic. It was cancelled with about 14 planes in production about 1958. Martin called the wing down angle 'cathedral' rather than 'anhedral'.

R.Soza, 01.12.2009

What an awsome striking looking aircraft! you can almost imagine it streaking fast and low over the tundra, leaving a wonderful smoke trail in its wake. Then it makes a steep turn before zooming back to altitude.It probably never happened, but hey what's an imagination for!!!

James Staley, 18.10.2009

Wouldn't this be impressive as a /172nd scale kit!!

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