Ace Baby Ace
1929
Back to the Virtual Aircraft Museum
  HOMEBUILTVirtual Aircraft Museum / USA / Ace  

Ace Baby Ace

The Ace Baby Ace was the world's first aircraft to be marketed as a homebuilt aircraft when its plans was offered for sale in 1929. Plans are still available and Baby Aces are still being built today. It was designed by Orland Corben.

It is a single seat parasol wing monoplane of conventional taildragger configuration. The fuselage is of fabric-covered tubular construction and the wings are wood. A variety of powerplants may be used, typically in the 65-100hp range.

SEE ALSO


Specification 
 MODELBaby Ace D
 CREW1
 WEIGHTS
    Loaded weight430 kg948 lb
    Empty weight270 kg595 lb
 DIMENSIONS
    Wingspan5.46 m18 ft 11 in
    Length8.08 m27 ft 6 in
    Wing area10.22 m2110.01 sq ft
 PERFORMANCE
    Max. speed176 km/h109 mph
    Ceiling3200 m10500 ft

Comments
BR, 09.12.2014

I have flown a Corben Baby Ace and this isn't one.

murphy, 18.09.2011

After reviewing a lot of the descriptions and photos of the planes on this site, I find many many of them to be the wrong photos, or descriptions. Does anyone check their facts before posting, or describing these aircraft?? For being a "virtual aircraft museum this site is really pretty poor overall.

baiwang, 18.06.2011

it may be that the above photo of an aircraft may not be the one described. wiki shows a monoplane and I seem to remember it as being one.

, 18.06.2011

Ace Baby Ace
1929

Barry, 07.04.2011

One thing for sure this picture and specification bares little resemblance to the Corben Baby Ace. Try the Ace Baby Ace website.

Alan Cagan, 18.03.2011

Built by Aircraft Engineering Corp A.C.E.) in Bethpage Long Island was the first commercially produced plane for the civilian market. Priced at $2500, and aerobatic, it was a commercial failure and only 7 were built. The only plane still in existence is at the Cradle Of Aviation Museum in Hempstead, Long Island.

rj, 30.08.2010

After checking with wiki, it may be that the above photo of an aircraft may not be the one described. wiki shows a monoplane and I seem to remember it as being one.

Richard Harris, 10.07.2009

Further info is available online at:
Corben Sport Planes
http://www.corbensportplanes.com/
AND at:
The Corben Club - Corben Aircraft
http://corbenflyer.tripod.com/
AND at:
The Official Guide to Experimental Aircraft - Ace page
http://www.exp-aircraft.com/aircraft/ace/ace.html

Richard Harris, 10.07.2009

The airplane depicted is a BIplane, NOT a "parasol wing monoplane", as you correctly describe the Corben/Ace 'Baby Ace' -- and possibly the biplane is a much earlier design (judging from its landing gear and vertical tail).

Do you have any comments about this aircraft ?

Name    E-mail


All the World's Rotorcraft


Virtual Aircraft Museum


All rhe World's Rotorcraft AVIATION TOP 100 - www.avitop.com Avitop.com