Anderson-Greenwood AG-14
1947
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Anderson-Greenwood AG-14

Anderson-Greenwood was formed 1941, suspended during war, reopened 1945 and AG-14 flown 1 October 1947. 2-seat pusher, five built.

Comments
Terrence I. Murphy, 05.08.2012

This should be it:

The Anderson Greenwood AG-14 two-seat, twin-tail, twin-boom, light cabin monoplane with a nacelle fuselage, and a tail-mounted pusher propeller that was powered by a 90hp Continental C-90 pusher engine. It was advertised in 1964, by Space Enterprises as, Space Coupe AG-14 with a 100hp Continental O-220 engine.
It first flew in October of 1947 and a production prototype flew three years later. A production line was set up and ready to go, unfortunately, the Korean War took precedent and only four production AG-14s were completed.

Crew: 2
Wingspan: 34 ft 7 in
Length: 22'0"
Empty weight: 550 lbs
Powerplant: 1 x 100 hp Continental O-220 engine

Terrence I. Murphy, 05.08.2012

Sorry guys, I put this plane in the wrong spot.

Terrence I. Murphy, 05.08.2012

This is the way I wrote it up in the book I'm working on:

The Douglas Cloudster II was an American, five-seat, light aircraft of the late 1940s. It was of unusual layout, with two buried piston engines driving a single pusher propeller. Only a single prototype was built, which only flew twice, as it proved too expensive to be commercially viable.
The Cloudster II was a low-winged monoplane with a retractable nosewheel undercarriage. The pilot and four passengers sat in an enclosed cabin well ahead of the unswept, laminar flow wing. Two air-cooled piston engines were buried in the rear fuselage, driving a single 8 foot diameter two-bladed propeller, mounted behind the tail via driveshafts taken from P-39 fighters. Two air intakes forward of the wing directed cooling air to the engines, which then exhausted beneath the fuselage.
The Cloudster II made its maiden flight in March 1947. Although the aircraft's performance and handling was good, it suffered from excessive vibration, and overheated when it was on the ground. It needed modifications and further development, but was abandoned late in 1947.
Crew: 1
Capacity: 4 passengers
Wingspan: 35 ft 4 in
Length: 39 ft 10 in
Height: 12 ft 0 in
Empty weight: 3,200 lbs
Gross weight: 5,085 lbs
Powerplant: 2 250 hp Continental E250 six-cylinder air-cooled piston engines
Max speed: 229 mph
Range: 950 mi

Terrence I. Murphy, 05.08.2012

This is the way I wrote it up in the book I'm working on:

The Douglas Cloudster II was an American, five-seat, light aircraft of the late 1940s. It was of unusual layout, with two buried piston engines driving a single pusher propeller. Only a single prototype was built, which only flew twice, as it proved too expensive to be commercially viable.
The Cloudster II was a low-winged monoplane with a retractable nosewheel undercarriage. The pilot and four passengers sat in an enclosed cabin well ahead of the unswept, laminar flow wing. Two air-cooled piston engines were buried in the rear fuselage, driving a single 8 foot diameter two-bladed propeller, mounted behind the tail via driveshafts taken from P-39 fighters. Two air intakes forward of the wing directed cooling air to the engines, which then exhausted beneath the fuselage.
The Cloudster II made its maiden flight in March 1947. Although the aircraft's performance and handling was good, it suffered from excessive vibration, and overheated when it was on the ground. It needed modifications and further development, but was abandoned late in 1947.
Crew: 1
Capacity: 4 passengers
Wingspan: 35 ft 4 in
Length: 39 ft 10 in
Height: 12 ft 0 in
Empty weight: 3,200 lbs
Gross weight: 5,085 lbs
Powerplant: 2 250 hp Continental E250 six-cylinder air-cooled piston engines
Max speed: 229 mph
Range: 950 mi

Javier, 03.12.2010

uppss.. sorry! (I forgot to introduce myself in the last post)

My name's Javier

Regards

zykral@hotmail .com, 03.12.2010

Hello everyone. I'm a fan of aviation, aerodynamics, 3D-design and flight simulation. AG1-4 really caught my attention, being a model of 50'-53', the aerodynamic taht presented ... at the forefront ... away from other "squared" models.

I wonder where I can find technical information about the aircraft and if possible drawings or photos in detail. I searched all over the Internet and get the typical pictures and PDF... not much more.

I lost the track in Oskosh-2008, now I'm happy to see it again (in good health) in Blakesburg-2010. I tried to contact with the current owner (Dave Powell) but his email count does not work.

Any help will be very appreciated.

If you want to help me, please write me to:

zykral @ hotmail .com

Thanks in advance.

Linda Pry, 21.10.2010

Worked at Anderson Greenwood for 10 years and Marvin Greenwood (the designer of the AG-14) was a wonderful man. Knew Woody Hering, too. Marvin's love of aviation did bring about the design of the Aries T-250 and it, too, was a wonderful high performance T-tail. Test pilot was Jack Burden. Marvin Greenwood, Al Presnal, Cleo Bickford, Rocky Howard, Bill Anderson, and others were the brilliant minds behind A/G's aviation dept.

Don Elliott, 20.10.2010

I flew one of these in the late 50's from CAE - Columbia, SC to the old Winnsboro, SC grass airport and back. Loved the way it flew. Don't know where it went to.

John Bolding, 05.09.2010

Owned S/N 2, buddy owned #5, both were restored , 4 out of 5 are still flying

Art McLemore, 16.04.2010

Saw this A/P at Sun N Fun This year. Looks like a modern design!
Real cool airplane.

Don Hering, 20.12.2009

This was my father's company. In the early 70s they began to design and build the Aries T-250/300. Bought Bellanca to have a mnf. plant.

John Hill, 03.03.2008

Are plans available for this model somwhere?

Do you have any comments about this aircraft ?

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