Boeing 737
1967
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Boeing 737

First flight of 737-100, 9 April 1967; FAA certification 15 December 1967. Superseded by 737-200; first flight 8 August 1967; added to 737-100 type certificate 21 December 1967; first delivery to United Air Lines 29 December 1967. Last of 1,114 Boeing 737-200s (and 30 737-100s) delivered August 1988; total includes 19 T-43A navigation trainers for US Air Force (subsequently redesignated CT-43A) and three Surveillers for Indonesian Air Force. Boeing 737s up to and including -500 are known as `Classic' series to differentiate them from `Next-Generation' variants beginning at -600.

Production go-ahead for Series 300 given March 1981; first flight 24 February 1984; certified 14 November 1984; first delivery (to USAir) 28 November 1984; 737-300 for Ansett Worldwide (and subsequent lease to British Midland Airways) rolled out at Renton 19 February 1990 (as 1,833rd 737); 737 orders passed 3,000 when Southwest Airlines ordered 34 in third quarter 1992. Approval for 120-minute ETOPS given November 1986, but withdrawn July 1989 due to concerns related to operation in heavy rain and hail; approval restored 14 September 1990. Commonwealth of Independent States Interstate Aviation Committee certified Boeing 737 family with P&W or CFM engines 18 January 1993; first delivery for Russian Federation and Associated States (CIS) registration (737-300 to National State Aviacompany Turkmenistan) 12 November 1992. 2,500th 737 rolled out 16 June 1993; 3,000th `Classic' 737, a 737-400 for Alaska Airlines (N793AS) first flew on 16 January 1998. Production of `Classic' averaged 9.5 per month during 1998, but line to be phased out over following two years, with only 44 scheduled for 1999 and final two in early 2000.

737-400

Stretched version of 737-300. Announced June 1986; rolled out 26 January 1988; first flight 19 February 1988; certified for up to 188 passengers 2 September 1988; first delivery (to Piedmont Airlines) 15 September 1988. High gross weight structure variant rolled out 23 December 1988; certified by FAA and delivered to first customer 21 March 1989. ETOPS approval granted 14 September 1990. Russian Federation and Associated States (CIS) certification with CFM engines 18 January 1993, as for 737-300.

737-500 - short-body version of 737-300, replacing 737-200.

Initially known as 737-1000; announced as 737-500 on 20 May 1987; first flight 20 June 1989; certified 12 February 1990 after 375 hour test programme; first delivery (to Southwest Airlines) 28 February 1990; ETOPS approval 14 September 1990. Russian Federation and Associated States (CIS) certification with CFM engines 18 January 1993, as for 737-300 and -400.

Boeing 737


Specification 
 CREW2-3
 PASSENGERS76-103
 ENGINE2 x P+W JT-8 D-7, 62.3kN
 WEIGHTS
    Take-off weight44000 kg97004 lb
    Empty weight23862 kg52607 lb
 DIMENSIONS
    Wingspan28.4 m93 ft 2 in
    Length28.7 m94 ft 2 in
    Height11.3 m37 ft 1 in
    Wing area91.1 m2980.59 sq ft
 PERFORMANCE
    Max. speed965 km/h600 mph
    Range w/max.fuel3800 km2361 miles
    Range w/max.payload3000 km1864 miles

Comments1-20 21-40
Moon, 22.03.2015

I have have worked on the 737(100 united)200-300-50-700-800 for 37 years what a dream.What an evolution in aviation.

Jetcopters Inc., 22.01.2015

I have a Boeing 737 on Call right now. If anyone is interested, please contact me.

George Haloulakos, CFA, 22.08.2014

The 737 has an amazing history! I recall flying on the first 737 commercial series that were commuter jets along the West Coast in the late 1960s - early 1970s, and then from the early 1990s into the 2000s flying non-stop, coast-to-coast on the extended range 737 models. My favorite 737 flights were in the 2000s flying non-stop, direct from Southern California to Maui on Aloha Airlines! And now there is the military 737 version designated as the P-8 Poseidon used for reconnaissance, intelligence and surveillance. Check out the great 737 article featured on page 14 of the Sept. 2014 edition of Air & Space magazine that focuses on how the engineering design changes on the engines were a contributing factor [with Southwest Airlines as one of the first major buyers] to making the 737 the top-selling commercial airplane in history [over 8,000 built with 3.400 more on order as of this writing.

HIGH FLIGHT
Aviation as a Teaching Tool for Finance,
Strategy and American Exceptionalism
By George A. Haloulakos, MBA, CFA
ISBN: 9780-1007-2738-0
Order your copy online at: ucsandiegobookstore.com
Or by phone: 858-534-4557
“Partial proceeds support aviation heritage”

CAPT. MIKE CRUMP, 12.11.2012

BUTCH...I arrived at Mather AFB summer 1976...flew initial test route; Travis to Hickam AFB, HI...38,383 lbs of JP4...made it, landing with < 5,000 lbs. of fuel. After USAF service, flew B737-300 & 400 @ Piedmont Airlines...What a workhorse...only complaint; very noisy wiper blades :)

Laurence Bourne, 14.08.2012

My first jet.Loved it.Flew the 300/400 with Air Europe 89 to 91.I remember
landing in Gibralter using full flap (40 deg.I think) and a wind gust causing them to blow back to about 30 deg.Also the 400 had an LED engine instrument display which given a low setting sun behind you made it difficult to read! Wonderful memories.

Ed Madigan, 05.05.2011

B-737-300. Flew it with Western Airlines and later Delta.
Like to refer to it as a Boeing sports car. Lot of get up and go, responsive, stable and damn fun to fly.

Harry Schneider, 12.04.2011

We had a few 737-100 & 200 at NORDAIR Canada and those had the highest utilization ratio worldwide. Hydraulic leaks were not uncommon, otherwise perfect aircrafts.

DR PRINCE SABASTINE, 05.04.2011

KIRIL I AM INTRESTED IN THE AIRCRAFT YOU MENTIONED BOEING 737 -300.LET ME HAVE THE FULL DETAILS IF ITS READY TO FLY WITH ALL WORTHYNESS COMPLIED.

RGDS
DR PRINCE
CEO/SONIF GROUP WEST AFRICA

Greg Dixson, 04.03.2011

While attending the University of Washington I worked at the University wind tunnel (the Kirsten Aerolab) in 1986 and 1987. We did low speed tests on the 737 in the summer of 1986. I remember it as being the 737-200 version but judging from what I read above it must have been the -300 (just before this we were testing the 747-400). The model provided by Boeing was huge, it barely fit in the 8' x 12' test section. It was so large and heavy that during a test with the tunnel running at high Q and the model at high angle of attack it broke the balance. We were down for quite a while while the flexures were being replaced and while we recalibrated. The computers in those days used for taking and processing data were VAXs the size of a large garbage can. Nowadays I understand its all done with laptops.

Greg Dixson, 04.03.2011

While attending the University of Washington I worked at the University wind tunnel (the Kirsten Aerolab) in 1986 and 1987. We did low speed tests on the 737 in the summer of 1986. I remember it as being the 737-200 version but judging from what I read above it must have been the -300 (just before this we were testing the 747-400). The model provided by Boeing was huge, it barely fit in the 8' x 12' test section. It was so large and heavy that during a test with the tunnel running at high Q and the model at high angle of attack it broke the balance. We were down for quite a while while the flexures were being replaced and while we recalibrated. The computers in those days used for taking and processing data were VAXs the size of a large garbage can. Nowadays I understand its all done with laptops.

BASEM MISHAL, 17.02.2011

HI

I HAVE AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE SALE A 1981 L-1011-100 TRISTAR, 362 PAX ALL Y IN GOOD SERVICEABLE CONDITIONS..............READY FOR IMMEDIATE OPERATION........ASKING PRICE $1,000,000.00 USD

IF INTERESTED PLEASE CONTACT ME DIRECTLY..........ONLY SERIOUS PEOPLE MAY CONTACT ME

BASEM MISHAL
STAR JET
+962795501637

BASEM MISHAL, 17.02.2011

HI
I AM LOOKING FOR A 1997 OR YOUNGER BOEING 737-400 FOR COMMERCIAL PASSENGERS USE

PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF YOU CAN ASSIST

BASEM MISHAL
STAR JET
+962795501637

Gene Elliott, 29.01.2011

I worked as an airline engineer on the B737-100 through the -500 for over 35 years. What a beautifully designed airplane and a real work horse! It is very reliable, fuel efficient and easy to work on. These things plus its unexcelled safety record are some of the reasons that it became the most popular twin jet airliner in the world.

BASEM MISHAL, 18.01.2011

I HAVE A 1993 BOEING 737-300 FRESH OUT OF D CHECK FOR IMMEDIATE SALE.

LET ME KNOW IF YOU ARE INTERESTED

BASEM MISHAL
LINK AIR CHARTER

Bob Harrell, 24.11.2010

As a United Captain, I flew the first revenue flight in the 737 around April 1968. It was a great airplane and over 40 years later, thye are still flying in many palces around the world.

Thrasher, 13.11.2010

Butch,
Does that mean that two were lost? I had the pleasure of working the avionics on Bobcats 1 and 2 from 1982 til 1989. Boxer 1 and 2 eventually were sent to us and even heard them referred to as Bobcat 3 and 4 yet Someone was using the call sign Bobcat 5 in his Civilian airplane. This is the first ETOPs I can say that I know of MatherAFB to Hickam Fld on a T-43A.

Curtis Thompson, 16.10.2010

I worked quality control on the final assembly plant on units 3-x while the 002 and (I think) the 005 were in flight test. One of my actions was to 'tag' the vertical stabilizer for what I thought was a sever weak point in a pivot hinge bolt. Two or three weeks later the engineers declared the stabilizer to be built as designed. Well, maybe... There was also a rear spar inhancement that involved grinding off paint and shot-peening the member. I tagged that work on one unit because the surface was too roughly ground to meet spesifications for shot peening. (Raised some dust since I wasn't supposed to know anything about such matters at age 19.)

Mohammad Bosal, 29.08.2010

I am looking to buy 3 Boeing 737-500/600 . cn u help me in this matter
Mohammad Bosal

Capt (ret) K.F. McLin, 16.08.2010

I flew the 200/300/400 series and loved every min. A real workhorse.

Darryl Johnston, 10.04.2010

The pestilence of the skies - and that's not a bad thing! every airline I've flown on in every country I've been in has one - in some form or another! Impressed me with performance (take-off and landing) at LPB El Alto, La Paz, Bolivia - 13,500 ft or somesuch.

1-20 21-40

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