Interstate TDR-1

1941

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Interstate TDR-1

The TDR-1 was a TV-guided drone powered by two Lycoming O-435-2 piston engines. It had a very simple cockpit which was manned by a backup pilot for test flights, the pilot only taking over the controls when the remote-control TV equipment failed or when the aircraft was landed. In unmanned operational missions,

Interstate TDR-1

Specification 
 ENGINE2 x 164kW Lycoming O-435-2 piston engines
 WEIGHTS
  Take-off weight2700 kg5953 lb
 DIMENSIONS
  Wingspan14.60 m48 ft 11 in
 PERFORMANCE
  Max. speed225 km/h140 mph
  Range685 km426 miles
 ARMAMENTone 900kg bomb or torpedo

Interstate TDR-1

Comments
rodney kellam, e-mail, 22.03.2014 17:40

we moved from California jn 1942 to Jamestown new York,my father was hired on as a supervisor in the paint department he developed a spray gun that would go thu the spars in the wings that would spay dope on the inside of the fabric that covered the wing surfaces.he worked there until the plant closed, Rodney kellam rskellam@new.rr.com the plant in Jamestown was called American aviation .

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Bob Lock, e-mail, 03.10.2013 14:28

I have a couple photos of this aircraft when it was parked at the Tulare County Airport back in the late 1950's. Would be happy to share.

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Ed McBride, e-mail, 29.11.2012 09:41

I learned to fly in NC 37300 Interstate Cadet in 1951. I paid $300 for half interest in it. I flew out of La Grande Or. I was 18 years old.

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Hans, e-mail, 23.12.2011 23:25

There was a TDR

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NIKOS VAMVAKAS, e-mail, 30.05.2011 19:03

douglas c-124 glombamaster

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Tom, e-mail, 12.04.2011 04:57

Interstate still exists, they are in Anaheim Ca and they make products for many of the UAV in use around the world. I hear that there is a picture of the first Cadet is hanging in their cafeteria.

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Joe Haug, e-mail, 06.04.2011 04:50

Look for a segment about the TDRs on an Episode of "History Detectives" this summer on PBS (2011).

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deaftom, e-mail, 05.04.2011 00:08

Some were also built by the Naval Aircraft Factory (Philadelphia, PA) under the designation TDN-1.

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Edward Martiny, e-mail, 03.04.2011 19:49

Our Air Museum is located at Airport Road in Jamestown, New York. We are looking for information about the TDR-1 production here in Jamestown.

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Steve Dawson, e-mail, 10.12.2010 20:33

I have jetsonable landing gear set for for TDRs.

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Jake H., e-mail, 08.12.2010 16:51

I have a particular interest in this aircraft, mostly because of the nature of it, and the fact that this is proof that we had anything even remotely resembling the u.a.v.'s that we have today. I find it remarkable that our aviation technologies were as advanced as they were in World War 2, and that the Interstate TDR-1 was as successful as as it was The fact that we even a surviving example of such a top secret plane that can be seen by the public is awesome. However, I can't find all the dimentions of the craft besides the wingspan, but I have figured the length to be about 34 to 36 feet, all I need to know now is the approximate height with and without the landing gear. If anyone knows the dimentions of this plane, I would be greatly pleased to know.

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Dan Cullman, e-mail, 07.06.2010 06:44

A few years ago AAHS published a study of the TDR with lots of real world WW2 photos. This was not a target drone. It was an "assault drone," a weapon that was used in the Pacific against heavily defended and fortified ships and positions on land. It could haul a 1000 pound bomb and when the clumsy landing gear was jettisoned, it had the capability of leaving it's TBM mothership "in the dust."

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Carl, e-mail, 31.03.2010 22:46

I got to fly an Interstate Cadet in the late 60's, out of Deer Valley Airport, Phoenix. A few years ago, there was and Interstate setting at a small airport along side I-5 just south of Myrtle Creek, Oregon. I don't remember the N number of it. I grew up in Cottonwood, Arizona. I was nine when we moved there in 1947. The flight training had ended by that time. As a kid I spent a lot of time at the airport.

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Guy OLiver, e-mail, 08.02.2010 20:55

I flew the Interstate Cadet in Cottonwood Ariz. during flight training for the USN. We as cadets were given 65 hours and if you succeeded you went on to Pre-Flight School. It was a great little plane and I must admit I exceeded its no-no list a few times. Did my first Immelman turn to keep from crashing into the narrowing walls of Oak Creek Canyon

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Jerry, e-mail, 23.01.2010 03:34

Most of these aircraft were used as target drones by the USN.

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Ken Koster, e-mail, 15.08.2009 19:32

Manufactured by Interstate Engineering in El Segundo, CA, and other models were the TDR2 & TDR 3. Interstate also produced the Cadet which was then designated the L-6 during WWII.

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Jer, e-mail, 10.03.2009 04:55

The TDR-1's were being developed and tested in my back yard so to speak.

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