Langley Aviation Twin 2-4-90
1942
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Langley Aviation Twin 2-4-90

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Comments
Barry, 08.07.2016

Built of mahogany veneers impregnated with vinyl and phenol in an attempt of construction without the use of strategic materials, the first model was the 2-4-65 and flew in 1940. The second model was the 2-4-90 which flew in 1941 and was taken on by the USN as the XNL 1. However, when the U.S.A. entered the war the phenol and vinyl used in the manufacturing process were found to be in short supply and so no long term manufacture was made.

Power plant 2 x 90 h.p Franklin 4AC

Span 35'2" Length 20'8"

Max speed 135 mph Range 400 miles Service ceiling 13,300 ft

Laurie Sak, 23.04.2015

Dear Al, I am Ken Schwonberg's daughter. He took me for a ride in this plane at East Long Beach Airport about 1954. Please contact me, I have many questions.

Mike Stoddard, 31.07.2010

I flew one for about 1 hour in 1950; It was a plywood duramold airplane. Easy to fly but noisy. It really carried four souls.

Carl Gerker, 07.04.2010

Al Chilcote please give me a message regarding the operational 2-4-90 flight

Al Chilcote, 28.02.2010

I flew one of these in 1955 at Sunset Beach Airport, Orange County, CA.
My understanding was that it was built as a basic twin engine trainer for the Navy. It had an unusual bungee setup for single engine to help with the rudders.

tom, 10.12.2009

can anyone send me plans for a full size replecia

tom, 10.12.2009

can anyone send me plans for a full size replecia

Carl, 22.09.2009

Aircraft was FAA/CAA Type Certified Model 4-2-90, a twin using Franklin 90 hp. engines with fixed pitch propellers. Five were known to be built. Manufactured of special heat formed aircraft plywood "Duramold". Fixed landing gear, four passenger. Could fly around 120 mph. In the 1960's one located in Tulsa,OK.

SSgt Baloo, 10.12.2008

I strongly suspect that the skin of that aircraft is plywood. That would explain the "grain" we see, and it was a common material from which to craft an aircraft in that time frame.

SSgt Baloo, 09.12.2008

I strongly suspect that the skin of that aircraft is plywood. That would explain the "grain" we see, and it was a common material from which to craft an aircraft in that time frame.

Lester, 11.09.2008

It looks as if it is of composite construction. Would that have been an option at that time?

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