Lockheed C-5 Galaxy
1968
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Lockheed C-5 Galaxy

The first C-5A Galaxy (#66-8303) was "rolled out" on 2 March 1968. On June 30th 1968 Lockheed-Georgia Co. began flight testing its new Galaxy C-5A heavy transport with the aircrafts first flight taking to the air under the call-sign "Allen-zero-three-heavy", upon completion of testing the first C-5A was transferred to the Transitional Training Unit at Altus Air Force Base, OK, in December 1969. Lockheed then delivered the first operational Galaxy to the 437th Airlift Wing, Charleston Air Force Base, SC, in June 1970. C-5s are stationed at Altus AFB, OK; Dover AFB, DE; and Travis AFB, CA. AMC transferred some C-5s to the Air Reserve components starting with Kelly AFB, Texas, in 1985; followed by Stewart Air National Guard Base, NY; and Westover Air Reserve Base, MA.

In the mid-1970s, wing cracks were found throughout the fleet. Consequently, all C-5A aircraft were restricted to a maximum of 50,000 pounds (22,680kg) of cargo each. To increase their lifting capability and service life, 77 C-5As underwent a re-winging program from 1981 to 1987. (In the redesigned wing, a new aluminum alloy was used that didn't exist ten years prior.) The final re-winged C-5A was delivered in July 1986.

The first C-5B incorporating significant improvements such as strengthened wings and updated avionics was delivered to Altus Air Force Base in January 1986. C-5 production concluded with delivery of the last "B" model aircraft in April 1989.

In March 1989, the last of 50 C-5B aircraft was added to the 76 C-5As in the Air Force's airlift force structure. The C-5B includes all C-5A improvements as well as more than 100 additional system modifications to improve reliability and maintainability. All 50 C-5Bs are scheduled to remain in the active-duty force, shared by comparably sized and collocated Air Force Reserve Associate units.

Based on a recent study showing 80 percent of the C-5 airframe service life remaining, AMC began an aggressive program to modernize the C-5. The C-5 Avionics Modernization Program began in 1998 and includes upgrading avionics to Global Air Traffic Management compliance, improving navigation and safety equipment, and installing a new autopilot system. Another part of the plan is a comprehensive re-engining and reliability improvement program, which includes new General Electric CF6-50 engines, pylons and auxiliary power units, with upgrades to aircraft skin and frame, landing gear and the pressurization system. This C-5M modernization program will restore aircraft reliability and maintainability, maintain structural and system integrity, reduce cost of ownership and increase operational capability well into the 21st century. Unlike its Russian counterpart, the civilian- and military-operated Antonov An-124, use of the C-5 is confined entirely to the military sector.

Lockheed C-5 Galaxy


Specification 
 CREW6
 ENGINE4 x GE TF-39-GE-1, 182.9kN
 WEIGHTS
    Take-off weight371000 kg817919 lb
 DIMENSIONS
    Wingspan67.9 m223 ft 9 in
    Length74.9 m246 ft 9 in
    Height19.8 m65 ft 12 in
    Wing area576.0 m26200.01 sq ft
 PERFORMANCE
    Max. speed920 km/h572 mph
    Cruise speed871 km/h541 mph
    Range w/max.fuel13472 km8371 miles
    Range w/max.payload5600 km3480 miles

Comments1-20 21-40 41-60
Stu Stewart, 12.07.2017

I attended the Lockheed factory maintenance (crew Chief ) program at the Lockheed Factory. We arrived at Lockheed in December 1968. Our class was the first maintenance class for the 437XX career field. Lockheed brought ship one to Edwards in the spring of 1969. Our Joint Air Force/Lockheed test flight program had four C-5A's at the height of the four year test program. Lockheed brought ship's 1, 2, and 3 to Edwards to do all of the major test flight requirements.
Ship one had a tail number of 303. This airplane was destroyed by a fire while it was at the Lockheed Factory for maintenance. The four years I spent at Edwards with the C-5A flight test program was the highlight of my twenty year career in the U.S. Air Force

Stu Stewart, 12.07.2017

I attended the Lockheed factory maintenance (crew Chief ) program at the Lockheed Factory. We arrived at Lockheed in December 1968. Our class was the first maintenance class for the 437XX career field. Lockheed brought ship one to Edwards in the spring of 1969. Our Joint Air Force/Lockheed test flight program had four C-5A's at the height of the four year test program. Lockheed brought ship's 1, 2, and 3 to Edwards to do all of the major test flight requirements.
Ship one had a tail number of 303. This airplane was destroyed by a fire while it was at the Lockheed Factory for maintenance. The four years I spent at Edwards with the C-5A flight test program was the highlight of my twenty year career in the U.S. Air Force

Craig E Salo, 19.02.2017

I started working with the 105th Airlift Wing at Stewart ANGB January 1984 as a Aero Repair Technician, I watched our first C-5A land and taxi in and saw the faces of the others who worked on O2 Cessna aircraft with disbelief, many of them retired soon after not wanting to tackle the job. I was one of the first new employees hired to work the C-5 but like others, I didn't have the experience after leaving active duty working F-111E. I retired March 2013 and still miss working "Fred". I also got a chance to work on the C5M Super Galaxy redoing the interior to give it a fresh look to go with the upgrades to the Engines and Avionics which gave the aircraft what it needed, more powerful,fuel saving,quiet running engines. It's amazing how the super operates. I wished the National Guard didn't give up on the Galaxy, i'd still be there maintaining them till I would have had to retire at 60,didn't make it due to the conversion to the C-17. Stewart ANGB had the most qualified dedicated maintainers around, many flight crews from other units said so and wanted to fly Stewart C-5's,especially during the wars. The Galaxy was a handful and a challenge but I grew to enjoy working and flying with them as a assistant crew chief.

John Griffith, 21.05.2016

I was stationed at Altus AFB in December 1969 when the first C5 was delivered. We watched that plane come out of the overcast and it just kept coming! We thought it would fall out of the sky it seemed so slow. After landing and lowering we put all of the 4MCG equipment on that one plane. I remember it took at least two C141s to haul us before that.

James D. Lester, 21.04.2016

I started at Lockheed-Georgia on July 8, 1963 as a assembly helper on the c130 line.In Jan 1964,I started training for jig and fixture builder. After three years, I was accepted into the last three(3 ) apprenticeship program for the machine shop. I have machined parts for the c5a, jetstar, L1011, and the c141. In 2006, the last c141 was brought back into the B1 building after a 43 year career.The C5 was and is an amazing airplane and I am sure it will serve our country well for years.

David Knight, 25.12.2015

Hello. I worked the C5 at Kadena for five years then st Travis for ten years. Would love to find somebody from those place that has some good pictures or that might have worked with me. Loved those planes. Retired 20 years now and miss my birds.
Take care.

David Knight, 22.12.2015

Hello. I worked the C5 at Kadena for five years then st Travis for ten years. Would love to find somebody from those place that has some good pictures or that might have worked with me. Loved those planes. Retired 20 years now and miss my birds.
Take care.

john, 23.01.2015

love this aircraft

Robert Henderson, 23.01.2015

Old “FAT ALBERT” later changed to “Fred” due to political correctness, has been a very meaningful part of my families life. My father was one of the 1st two flight engineers “Cadre” the Air Force sent to Marietta, GA, in 1969, to be trained by the Lockheed company. After finishing, we moved from Tinker AFB, OK to Altus AFB, OK, where he helped write the -1 for the C-5A. Then after a few years, are family and several others were moved from Altus to Travis AFB, CA in 1972 where my Dad flew the line and later was assigned to the flight simulators. My Dad retired in 1976 at Travis AFB, and I started on Reserve duty from 1980-1984 and active duty 1984-2004 also at Travis AFB. I entered the Air Force as a Jet Engine Mechanic assigned to the 60th MAC, and saw part of the world on Maintance Recovery Teams, fixing C-130, C-141A, B and C-5A, B Aircraft. In 1994, I started flying as a Flying Crew Chief to see the rest of the world, as my Dad would say “I flew the line” and traveled the world on the C-5 A, B, and C models. The Presidential, and NASA support missions were the best and I went and saw places my Dad described to me as a kid, and now, I was seeing first hand. This Aircraft is a milestone in my families history, and when I hear aircraft taking off or landing that distinctive sound tells me if it’s a C-5.

Charles Speir, 15.01.2015

I was a Loadmaster in the 301 AS from 1983 to 2010. Even though we converted to C-17s in 2005, I enjoyed "FRED" and still have many great memories of those days.
Which base was 69-0012 originally stationed at?

George Williams, 05.09.2013

Flew as a passenger in this plane into Dhaharan for Desert Shield/Desert Storm. Merle English is right about climbing into the cabin behind the cockpit, especially when burdened with three bags of TA-50 gear and clothing. It sure beat the web seats of the C141 Starlifter, the plane I re-deployed to stateside. It was more like a flying refrigerator.

Merle English, 05.06.2013

amazing beast, you have to be half billy goat to climb that flimsy ladder to the upper cabin and cockpit! I had training at Travis and was signed off for everything except start the engines or taxi. Was at Hickham and always had MP's guarding the plane and to find shade in the day they would stand at the wing tip. Since that C-5 landed at night and we pumped it full guess what happened after the heat of the day arrived? Yea the fuel would expand and run out to the overflow tank at the wing tips and since there was no power on the small transfer pump was not running and then the fuel would gush out the tip vent and get the MP's quite often, hopefully only once. Servicing the LOX was interesting when the liquid hit the drip pans, had some fond memories!

mike jordan, 22.11.2012

I worked on the very first c5 at Lockheed as a final aircraft assembler. I did many jobs on it starting with the barrel section, put in the heat and air, brakes, honey comb floors, hydraulics, lavatories you name it and I was there the day it flew what a thrill.

Deb, 17.10.2012

I worked hydraulics on Fred while stationed at Travis. We were ALWAYS busy but I would not have traded my time working on the C5 for anything.

Mark Baker Jr, 22.09.2012

The first time I saw a C5 was at blytheville afb where I was shipping out for Anderson afb guam for linebackerII.
The second time with the C55A was at Westover AFB in 1987 where I worked on them util 2010 as a sheetmetal tech,the aircraft was a beast to work on,I know that when maintance had to do most of there work it was off high reach stands,such as B5,B1,Vap,JLG,and the condor for the T tail. Any time you had to wal the backbone or the wings you have to wear a harness,which made any easy harder.
I am retired and still close to westover where I can still hear the engine runs and hear them fly over my house.

Dave Kretzmer, 02.06.2012

I grew up in Marietta, Ga not far from the Lockheed plant and remember hearing and seeing them routinely. My father in-law Ray Clark worked as an engineer for Lockheed mating the tail to the fuselage among many other Projects on other A/C. I loaded many a C-5 with the 437/315 composite wing at CHS AFB in the late 80's. Stationed with AFRES at Dobbin AFB across the field from the Lockheed plant, Lockheed gave us a mock up fuselage to use as a trainer.

Steve Hale, 17.04.2012

Loadmaster for 1980 to 1986 Travis life was GREAT

John Hull, 11.02.2012

What is the speed ofa c5 at landing. I know the speed varies with weight of payload but can you give an average. Thanks

John Hull, 11.02.2012

What is the speed ofa c5 at landing. I know the speed varies with weight of payload but can you give an average. Thanks

John Griffith, 29.12.2011

I was at Altus AFB assigned to the 4th Mpbile Comm Gp when the first C5 was delivered. I will never forget the sight of that gigantic plane emerging from the clouds seemingly just barely moving. To this day, I am impressed by them and I can still identify one just by the engine whine.

1-20 21-40 41-60

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