North American F-93
1950
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North American F-93

The North American YF-93A, developed from the F-86 Sabre and originally designated F-86C, eventually became the third design in the penetration fighter competition with the McDonnell XF-88 and Lockheed XF-90. The YF-93A was a bigger, bulkier Sabre: the nose inlet of the F-86 design was replaced with side-mounted inlets and the fuselage was widened to house a 12835kg thrust Pratt & Whitney turbojet. The result was a larger, heavier machine with longer range and greater load-carrying capacity than the Sabre. On 9 June 1948, the USAF ordered 118 F-93s, but the order was cancelled a year later. The YF-93A lost its second chance to attain production status when it emerged a poor third in the penetration fighter contest which, as it turned out, did not result in any production contract anyway.

The first of the two YF-93As, also known as the company NA-157, was first flown on 24 January 1950. The two machines underwent various modifications during evaluation, including changes in the shape of their lateral air inlets. After the USAF was no longer a potential buyer, the two airframes were turned over to the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), where they were employed in various tests until eventually being retired and scrapped.

3-View 
North American F-93A three-view drawing (1280 x 822)


Specification 
 MODELYF-93A
 WEIGHTS
    Take-off weight12025 kg26511 lb
    Empty weight16360 kg36068 lb
 DIMENSIONS
    Wingspan11.81 m39 ft 9 in
    Length13.44 m44 ft 1 in
    Height4.78 m16 ft 8 in
    Wing area28.43 m2306.02 sq ft
 PERFORMANCE
    Max. speed1140 km/h708 mph
    Ceiling14265 m46800 ft

Comments
bombardier, 2888617=gmail.com, 21.10.2011

That plane would have escorted the B-29s and taken care of the MiGs over Korea had it been put into production

Bob Waldo, bobdw=harbornet.com, 25.03.2010

The F93 had the Rolls Royce Tey (or Tay) engine with afterburner. The engine had a centrifugal compressor together with a flush air intake. NACA Lewis published a report showing the incompatibility between the flush intake and centrifugal compressors. Performance was badly compromised so a quick fix using a ram intake which we referred to as the Lockheed inlet after the F80. This fixed the performance but too late for the competition. During the Korean conflict I regretted the failure of the F93 to be produced as it would have made a great ground support airplane with its less vulnerable axial compressor.

GARY BEDINGER, gary.bed=verizon.net, 06.01.2010

I'VE HAD A VERY LARGE INTEREST IN MILITARY AIRCRAFT FOR MANY,MANY YEARS.THE NORTH AMERICAN YF-93 SHOULD'VE BEEN PUT INTO FULL PRODUCTION,BUT,AS WITH THE U.S.MILITARY JETS THAT WERE SO GREAT,FOR EXAMPLE THE LOCKHEED F-80 "SHOOTING STAR",THIS JET HAD MANY BUGS THAT NEEDED TO BE FULLY "STAMPED" OUT.

John Heron, thudjock=btinternet.com, 12.06.2008

12835kgs (28,000lbs) from a 1950s P&W powerplant? More like 2835 kgs from the J48.
Also the weights quoted are inaccurate where the TO weight is shown to be much less than the quoted empty weight. The corrrect weights should be about 14,500lb empty and 21,000lb normal operating

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