North American T-28 Trojan

1949

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North American T-28 Trojan

First flown in 1949, the Trojan was put into production as the T-28A two-seat basic trainer for the USAF. Power was provided by a 596kW Wright R-1300-1 radial engine. The T-28B was the initial US Navy version fitted with a 1,062kW Wright R-1820-86 engine and a two-piece sliding canopy (as fitted to late production T-28A). Two further T-28 versions were produced: the T-28G with deck-arrester gear; and the T-28D, a converted T-28A with a 1,062kW R-1820-56S engine and strengthened airframe for light-attack duties. An attack-trainer version was designated AT-28D. A licence-built version was also made in France as the Fennec.

Specification 
 MODELT-28B "Trojan"
 CREW2
 ENGINE1 x Wright Cyclone R-1820-86, 1063kW
 WEIGHTS
  Take-off weight3856 kg8501 lb
  Empty weight2914 kg6424 lb
 DIMENSIONS
  Wingspan12.22 m40 ft 1 in
  Length10.06 m33 ft 0 in
  Height3.86 m13 ft 8 in
  Wing area24.90 m2268.02 sq ft
 PERFORMANCE
  Max. speed552 km/h343 mph
  Ceiling10820 m35500 ft
  Range1706 km1060 miles

Comments1-20 21-40 41-60 61-80 81-100 101-120 121-140
Bob Griffiths RN, e-mail, 29.10.2012 14:38

My first ever flight was with Lt Walker USN, who subsequently became the officer who brought the T28 into the training program in Pensacola, that was around September 1953. Our term (February 1953) were the last people to go through the training course on the SNJ Harvard and the F6F Hellcat, superceded by the T28 and the F9F

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Richard Russell, e-mail, 05.10.2012 07:46

I was stationed at Whiting Field 1962-1963. I am trying to track down anyone who may served there. In particular Lt. Sherman. If any one served there or knows about Lt. Sherman please drop me a line. Thanks, RR

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Chic White, e-mail, 23.09.2012 23:15

Gentlemen, please tell me where and why did they name the T-28B the "TRojan"? Thank you.

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CDR Foots Huston, USN, ret, e-mail, 31.07.2012 22:00

I flew the T28B /C as a cadet in 1959. CarQual on Antietam OCT 59. Later flew B model an Barbers Pt. Great airplane. Too bad so few got to bring it aboard.

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Zippo, 23.06.2012 00:48

Good aircraft, i love it. Do you should have the line drawing of the aircraft and more information for the review

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Zippo, 23.06.2012 00:48

Good aircraft, i love it. Do you should have the line drawing of the aircraft and more information for the review

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Mark Childers, e-mail, 18.06.2012 07:25

T-28G???? what's that about? I remember Danny Dawson and can vouch for his seat and turn time. I was one of a handful of qualified outlying field mechs in both VT2 and VT6 - from Jan 68 thru April 71 - just about every day I got to fly back seat on NADEP acceptance flights, PMCFs and cross countrys to chase down and repair stranded aircraft. I recorded 236 flights and 496 hours, including one trap on the Lex in a VT5 bird, but not counting my tour as the turn guy in the Yellow Peril - the T-28 bail out trainer on a stick behind AMD. And did it for a whopping $40 a month in flight pay... Biggest problem with the T-28....every single-engine, high wing propster I've ever flown is a wallowing dog by comparison...

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richard russell, e-mail, 09.05.2012 22:59

I was stationed at whiting field 1962-1963. I was not attached to a squadron. I was attached to NAAS. (central hanger) We had 6 planes on the line. 3 T-28, and 3 SNB 5s.(Beachcraft) I was a plane captian on the beach craft. I got in a lot of flying time in T-28's though. I love that plane. Pilots let me fly.
Would someone please describe the duties of the plane captian. I am trying to convince people that I was not a pilot. My job was the care and feeding my plane. ABC maintenance. I sure would appreciate this. Even the VA doesn't know what a plane capt. is.

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ROBT."ROBIN"ARMOUR, e-mail, 04.05.2012 22:17

Far and away the best prop' trainer ever in the USAF inventory. Swinging that two blade prop by the radial engine was a real feel of the horses at the end of the throttle linkage. The T-28 was more of a machine than any of the jets I flew afterward or bug smashers I've flown since. Thanks to all the maintenance crews that gave me such a safe and rewarding aircraft to fly.

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ROBT."ROBIN"ARMOUR, e-mail, 04.05.2012 22:13

Far and away the best prop' trainer ever in the USAF inventory. Swinging that two blade prop by the radial engine was a real feel of the horses at the end of the throttle linkage. The T-28 was more of a machine than any of the jets I flew afterward or bug smashers I've flown since. Thanks to all the maintenance crews that gave me such a safe and rewarding aircraft to fly.

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Danny Dawson, 27.04.2012 18:14

Although I wasn't a pilot, but I've got tons of seat time in the T-28. I was an ADR working in check crew at NAAS Whiting Field from 1969 through 1973 in Squadrons VT-2 and VT-6. I was high power turn qualified and got to run them through their paces on the ground as well as seat time with the test pilots. I truely loved working on them. I've done so many high power runs back then I'll bet I can still fire one up today on the first try without a back fire....LOL

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Luke Memminger, e-mail, 22.02.2012 04:24

I just got back from Corpus seeing my son who is in Primary flying the T34C. We went by the Hangar where I was in Primary in the T-28C in 1976. There was a T-28 on a flatbed trailer with quite a bit of corrosion. I was in the NIFTS syllabus. The Navy was transitioning from the T34-B to the T-34C, and didn't have enough, so they sent a bunch of us to Corpus for the NIFTS syllabus to fly the T-28. They said the only thing they would guarantee was that we wouldn't get Helos. I was the first in line. I will never forget taxiing across Ocean Drive with all the morning traffic stopped while I rumbled across on the way to the runway. PS: My son's comment when he saw the T-28 on the back of a flatbed at the Hangar..."That thing is huge."

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FRED OSBORN, e-mail, 12.02.2012 19:57

Class 58J or K at Bainbridge Air Base, GA. First solo Beech T-34A 29 April 1957. First solo North American T-28A
24 June 1957. About 140 hours both aircraft. T-28A was fun
to fly and response was terrific. Nostalgia sets in when
spotting a USAF or USN version.

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Mike Poole AMS-2 USN, e-mail, 07.02.2012 20:58

While working Line Crew with VT-3, I flew back seat (when empty, with an instructor) in the T-28C's back in 1966 though 1967 at NAAS Whiting Field. Got to fly a lot of cross county, after maintenance flights and weather hops, what a great aircraft. Left NAAS Whiting Field in 1968 to be reasigned to VP-9, NAS Moffett Field, Ca. to fly aircrew in the Lockheed P-3B, which a lot of pilots had been trained in the T-28's

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Bob Mutchler, e-mail, 06.01.2012 22:09

Flew the T-28 at Marana AB, Tucson, AZ in 1956, Class 57 November. Lots of solo time after the T-34. Great instructor Walt Smith taught me how to do snap rolls at the top ends of Lazy Eights. Really a great plane to start a lifelong love of flying.

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Ron Konkle, e-mail, 19.09.2011 20:18

In 1957 I flew the T-28 at Cabiness Field, Corpus Christi. 100 hours in the back seat - never soloed. One day the instructor was teaching me to do spins - hold the nose just above the buble while rolling over. After about a dozen tries, I was ready to do more but he said that was enough and grabbed a barf bag. Great plan to fly.

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John Moore, e-mail, 03.08.2011 22:36

My brother was killed in a T28 crash in June 1970 while training pilots out of Pensacola Naval Air Station. His name was Capt. Earl R. Moore Jr. from Erwin NC. Does anyone remember him? He had recentely returned from Vietnam where he flew with the HMM-364 squadron. Thank you John Moore

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tom walsh, e-mail, 09.07.2011 21:29

I have seen several familiar names on this site...Flew the
T-28 at Graham in 58-F and loved it. While flying one week-end at SQL 40 years later I noticed a Trojan in AF colors taking off....it was a Graham bird (same tail number
of plane I had flown several times in 1957) Got that old lump in the throat! Great memories

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Jay Phelan, e-mail, 06.07.2011 22:54

My flight surgeon class (no. 123...graduating in the spring of 1970) was scheduled to train in the T-34, but due to heavy demand for Vietnam pilots, the squadrons were overbooked, so we were sent to Whiting for T-28 training. I was not thrilled, because I'd never flown anything before, but once I got over the shakes, I found that I could fly the thing, and after 12 instructional hops I was told by my off-wing instructor, "well, you won't kill yourself....safe to solo". What a rush that solo was, after waiting nearly four hours for an aircraft to become available! Never soloed a navy aircraft again, as that was our one authorized solo. Only ten of the class of 50 did solo, and eight of the ten already had their private licenses.

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Ken Green, e-mail, 06.07.2011 10:01

Taking a ride in a T-28 is on my bucket list. I logged a little over 100 hours in one as a NavCad at Whiting Field in 1958. I'd be delighted to pay the expenses for a 1 /2 hour or so ride in one. I'm at jascain@aol.com and live in Los Angeles.

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