Northrop F-89 Scorpion
1948
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Northrop F-89 Scorpion

Designed to replace P-61 "Black Widow" as an all-weather fighter. The first prototype flew on August 16, 1948. 1232 built.

3-View 
Northrop F-89 ScorpionA three-view drawing (592 x 818)


Specification 
 MODELF-89D
 ENGINE2 x Allison J35-A-35, -33A, -41, -47 afterburning turbo-jet, 3266kg
 WEIGHTS
    Take-off weight19160 kg42241 lb
    Empty weight11428 kg25195 lb
 DIMENSIONS
    Wingspan18.19 m60 ft 8 in
    Length16.41 m54 ft 10 in
    Height5.36 m18 ft 7 in
    Wing area52.21 m2561.98 sq ft
 PERFORMANCE
    Max. speed1024 km/h636 mph
    Ceiling14995 m49200 ft
    Range4184 km2600 miles
 ARMAMENT3 x "Falcon" guided missiles, 104 x 70mm missiles

Comments1-20 21-40 41-60 61-80 81-100
Bert Schwind, beegooglee1=wildblue.net, 05.04.2014

I was assigned (1955-1957) to the 318th and 75th at Presque Isle, first as Communications Officer and then as OIC of all Electronics, Electrical, Weapons and Instrument shops. Well remember when we finally build the nose hangers to keep out the weather. 'Backseated' with Ted Harris (Ops OIC), Bob Mize, and Don Zook. Lucky to have been there when the Squadron went from second last to first in rocketry proficiency during the summer of 1956 at Moody AFB. The unit broke all existing records for Hi Sqdn, Hi CO, Hi Ops Off, Hi Sq RO, Hi Pilot, & Hi RO. I can still see the big score thermometer in front of our HG building rising to the top and looping around. And those winters! 181 inches of snow and 40 Deg below. I transferred to Nellis AFB in March '57. 100 deg change in temp during the week long drive to Nevada.

j d jackson, desertdruggist=hotmail.com, 05.03.2014

Was with 61FIS at Harmon '53-'55, first with F-94B then transitioned to F-89D, ugly but it grew on you. Easy to fly but def not for dog-fights. Most scrambles with for B-47's and '52s going from Offut to Germany, mostly at night.

bernard schnieders RO 54FIS, bernienboop=yahoo.com, 23.02.2014

Was a back seater In the J model. Our alert barn is now the musuem bld at Ellswoth. A 89H that fired the live atomic rocket in Nevada is located at the civilian field at Great Falls mont.

jim curry, elainepcurryatyahoo,com, 17.12.2013

to robert woods iwas at kef when that happened i worked at the alert hanger and lived in hut 10 i was there from nov 57 til nov 58 i am also 75 its been a long time

Joe Kenny, 24.07.2013

Was a crew chief on 89 c and d With 74th fighter.We set a flying record with the 89,s 1954 and 55.Made the stars and stripes and also the flying tiger history book but cant find either one.No bragging rights

Bill Hoey, billh93611=comcast.net, 03.06.2013

Hi Gang,

Stationed at Goose bay Labrador 56-57 assigned to Post Dock working out in 10 below. My NCOIC was TSGT Cole. He slipped on the ice by the left engine and was sucked into the intake. He survived and retired from the USAF.
I'm living in Fresno Ca.
The Castle Air Museum needs several Pilots cockpit instruments for the F89J model. Need HELP please
Bill Hoey

Marc B, bmarc4444=yahoo.com, 26.05.2013

My father was a navigator in the F-89D in Alaska.
Capt. Joesph "Doc" Blanchard. Looking for any info on his aircraft and anyone's remember him.

Charles Mooers, mooers=gmail.com, 25.05.2013

Anyone remember the accidental firing of rockets inside the hanger. The commander was Major Danniel (Chappy) James, 437th FIS. The year was 1954 or 55. Would appreciate more details.

Robert Wood, dwain_w=yahoo.com, 27.02.2013

I was a radio repair guy working on F-89D's at Keflavik AB, Iceland in 1957, my friend Robert Nelson was ate(proper term) by an '89 in the winter of 57/58. God rest his soul, he was 19 years old I am now 75.

Paul Tyler, tylerpaulc=cs.com, 19.02.2013

From May 1955 until August 1967 I was a weapons mechanic in the 63 FIS at Elmendorf AFB, AK. Would like to hear from others what served at the same time.

Gary Martin, Smokeydawg1=yahoo.com, 10.10.2012

My Dad worked on f89'S AND f 102's In Portland. I believe on crashed into the columbia river in about 1954. Dad was a Mechanic and a scuba diver.. So he donned his gear and helped with the recovery.

Fred Miller, fredkaymil=aol.com, 26.06.2012

Wurtsmith AFB 1957 vets: Remember your first deliveries of the W-25 nuclear warheads for the MB-1 in DEC 56, JAN 57 and MAY 57 by train from the Burlington IA AEC arsenal? I was the Nuclear Weapons Officer assigned TDY from Stony Brook AFS MA (Westover AFB) to coordinate the receipt. Much to everyone's surprise the AEC train commander in MAY would only deal with me instead of the base commander. For a fleeting moment I thought I might sign off and take the train off-base to sell to the highest bidder. But then after what seemed like hours of stand off, more level heads prevailed and we cooked up a deal for me to sign personally, transfer control to our 3084th ADG supply officer in MA who in turn transferred the warheads back to the Wurtsmith commander. A first order SNAFU was averted.

P S I am still looking for the F-86 jet jockey who one night in DEC 56 at the Officers Club offered to take me back to Westover. His buddies, luckily, told me to decline because he would probably loop and roll all the way home.I developed a cold in my....


Fred Miller

George J Leiby, george.leiby=comcast.net, 21.05.2012

Hi Guys,

Was a F89D/F94C radar mechanic of the 3630th A&E Maintenance Squad starting in 1956 through 1958 at Moody AFB. Loved the F89 and had the pleasure of working on a 94 when a fellow playing in the cockpit released the tip tanks at the radar "docks". Anyone interested in interacting about Moody or James Connally AFB during the late 50's, give me a shout.

Ron Headding, rnheadding=netscape.net, 12.05.2012

I was a crew chief on the F89D in 59-60 at Keflavic, Iceland.

Klaatu83, klaatu83=lycos.com, 15.04.2012

The F-89 Scorpion was the USAF's first aircraft designed specifically to be an all-weather jet fighter. The term "all-weather" meant operations at night or in reduced visibility, and indicated the use of built-in radar. In those days, that meant the aircraft had to be large enough to accommodate a crew of two in addition to the radar, armament and fuel. The inevitable result was a fairly sizable and complex aircraft in comparison with, say, an F-80 or F-86. The F-89 was not designed with a view towards going on-on-one in a dogfight with a Mig, but rather to intercept potential attacks by Soviet intercontinental nuclear bombers against North America. Given that context, the design of the F-89 was more comparable with the Avro Canada's CF-100, than it was with fighters such as the F-86 Saber or Mig 15.

Wayne Steensma, steensmas=sio.midco.net, 24.03.2012

I was in the SD Air Guard and crewed F89D 51-11425 from 1958-1960. The aircraft was given to the city of Aberdeen SD and placed on display at the entrance to their airport.
After a few years it was removed and don't know where it ended up
SD 51-11443 was given to the city of Sioux Falls and placed in the city's Sherman Park. Later it was taken to a farm south of Canton and later to a farm north of Brandon SD. Here it is on the farm of a former SD Air Guard pilot. If you get on Googl Earth, find Brandon SD. go north on the highway til you come to a curve to the east
(right) Keep straight for a mile and 1/4 there is a home on the right side and you will see a cut up F89D SN 443 in the back yard.

Jon wagner, derlogi=yahoo.com, 06.12.2011

I worked for Northrop at their smaller plant in Anaheim, CA in 1954-55. The F-89 was built at the main plant in Hawthorne, CA across from LAX. The main product at the Anaheim plant was the T-179 periscope and gun barrel sight for a 155mm mobile howitzer; which I worked on as a precision instrument mechanic. When we ran out of part I was temporarily shifted to a small sub-assembly line making F-89 ejection seats and wing pylons for weapons and fuel tanks.

Randy Bridger, randy.bridger=us.army.mil, 22.10.2011

My Dad was the Navigator in the F-89 Scorpion, flew from say 1951-1956...at Moody, Duluth, etc....His name is James A. Bridger, Jr...Jim Bridger, anyone know him or fly with him, let me know. Thanks.

Tim Sawyer (MSgt, USAF, retire, sawyerx4=bellsouth.net, 14.10.2011

My dad worked on F-89Ds at Earnest Harmon AFB in Newfoundland somewhere between 1955 and 1957. He was a weapons troop. Anyone stationed there at this time who may have known him please respond. His name was Ben Sawyer, Jr. from Morgan, Georgia. The sergeant who took him "under his wing" was named Sgt Moe and I believe he was from Tallahassee Florida. My dad said he practically knew everyone on the base. Daddy was friends with a fellow named Robert Poe from St. Louis Missouri and Bill Norwicky (spelling?) who I believe was from New York. I just recently visited my dad in Georgia and we were sharing some good stories about our Air Force times. I retired in 2001. Aim High - Air Force!

Dick Gardner, dcapt96=gmail.com, 23.08.2011

Like Galen Burke I flew with the WisANG 126th FIS and 176th FIS 1958 to 1965. We flew Ds and Js. We kept the Russians from coming over the Canadian border. During an over-night at El Toro MCAS the ground guys wanted to tie the 89 down and I told them not to waste their time. The dash one said it would take 160 knots of wind to move it from a static position so by then the hangars and everything would be gone.

1-20 21-40 41-60 61-80 81-100

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