Back Boeing-Vertol 301 / XCH-62
1975

Boeing-Vertol 301 / XCH-62

This big "flying crane" built for the US Army's HLH (Heavy Lift Helicopter) specification, was put into storage prior to completion when the programme was cancelled in October 1974. In 1983 plans were initiated to resume the test programme with a possible first flight in 1985. The HLH would be capable of carrying 20 tonnes over a distance of nearly 40km.

G.Apostolo "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Helicopters", 1984

Boeing-Vertol 301 / XCH-62


Photo Gallery 

Boeing-Vertol 301 / XCH-62

This is the unfinished Boeing Vertol XCH-62 (serial 72-2012), the planned prototype of the Army's HLH program. Note the rear-facing position for the cargo operator and the overall similarity to the Boeing Vertol 107/114 designs for tandem-rotor helicopters

This is Boeing Vertol's 347, built to test HLH systems and concepts. A retractable cargo-operator's cockpit facing rearwards was fitted just in front of the forward landing gear.

Technical data for XCH-62

Engine: 3 x Allison T701 turboshaft, rated at 5945kW, rotor diameter: 28.0m, length: 27.20m, height: 8.70m, take-off weight: 53572kg, empty weight: 26754kg

Boeing-Vertol 301 / XCH-62

Comments 
soccer, e-mail, 11.06.2011

Any suggestions greatly appreciated.

Bob, e-mail, 01.09.2010

Reply to sparky081979=yahoo.com, The Chinook variant you saw was a Model 347. It's pictured just below the HLH, above. It was a flying test bed for the fly-by-wire flight control system proposed for the HLH.

nike air max 90, e-mail, 09.07.2010

Nike Air Max 90 shoes are sold so well on iofferitems.com.

Ian Cognito, 18.07.2009

For replacing broken rotor blades in houses with kids, dogs etc, buy pies covered in clear plastic lids, trim to size, drill a hole, drop onto shafts, glue. While glue dries, eat pies. Friends and family can help. Cakes or salads are optional. Everything else is grief.

Ron, e-mail, 17.07.2009

I have an HLH desktop model. The rotor blades are broken and I need replacements. Any idea where I can find them? Each blade is approx. 5 1/2" long (from tip to center of rotor head - 11" diameter) and 1/2" wide. They are black with a 1/4" yellow tip on each blade and attach via a pin in the center of the rotor head which fits into a hole in the pylon. There are 4 blades on each rotor. Any suggestions greatly appreciated.

army aircrewmember, e-mail, 10.05.2009

i was just recently at the U.S. Army aviation museum at Fort Rucker and i noticed a chinook variant with fixed wings mounted to the top part of the fusalage, retractable front main landing gear, and what looked like a large hatch on the bottom of the front portion of the fusalage. What is the history on that???
The museum had nothing in the line of a discription for it and other static displays there at the museum.
As a Army Aviation war Veteran i was appalled and embarrassed to see the condition and complete lack of pride in the history of these static displays. If i lived near or was stationed at Ft Rucker, i would volunteer many hours and weekends to at least cleaning these relics up. That museum should be ashamed!!!

jim, 09.05.2009

The Helicopter Museum has taken delivery of parts recovered from the Boeing XCH-62 Heavy Lift Helicopter (HLH), cancelled as a project in 1975 and eventually scrapped at Fort Rucker in Alabama in October 2005. Designed to carry external loads of up to 20,000 kg (20 tons) around the battlefield, the HLH featured a 27 m (89 ft) long fuselage with tandem rotors each spanning some 28 m (92 ft), and stood around 12 m (38 ft) high.

Plans to move it in the autumn of 2005 had to be abandoned due to the cost and the level of corrosion but, hearing of its likely fate, Helicopter Museum Chairman Elfan ap Rees moved quickly to try and save the huge helicopter and, with the help of the US Army Aviation Museum director Steve Maxham, managed to salvage some key components including the 5.5 m (18 ft) long main landing gear and nose wheels for display in the UK museum. The landing gear will now go on display alongside a much smaller XCH-62 predecessor, the Piasecki HUP, to give visitors a scale to relate to the dimensions of the HLH.

Shipment of the parts was organised and sponsored jointly by manufacturer Boeing and Columbia Helicopters, civil operators of the BV234 Chinook, with support from the UK Museum, Libraries & Archive Council PRISM fund and Helicopter INTERNATIONAL and HeliData News publisher Avia Press Associates.



http://www.helicoptermuseum.co.uk/news.htm

a, e-mail, 22.02.2009

Aircraft now moved to museum in England:
http://www.shephard.co.uk/news/1809//

Gary, e-mail, 09.02.2009

I wasn't there, but I was told that they were attempting to move it and broke the landing gear. After that they made the decision to destroy it. Since most of it was mock-up anyway, I don't imagine there was must worth keeping after the gear broke anyway.

Gary, e-mail, 09.02.2009

I wasn't there, but I was told that they were attempting to move it and broke the landing gear. After that they made the decision to destroy it. Since most of it was mock-up anyway, I don't imagine there was must worth keeping after the gear broke anyway.

Tore Eriksson, e-mail, 11.12.2008

The serial no was 73-22012, not 72-2012,.

ATC Instructor, e-mail, 08.11.2008

Not any more she doesn't. The army in its infinite wisdom, had her destroyed where she sat outside of Yano Hall next to Guthrie field. I know cause I watched them destroy her with a bulldozer or what ever they call those things they have been tearing up the wooden buildings with. I was really up set. I was here when they flew it in as a sling load of a Chinook, CH47 and couldn't believe they could or would be so callous.

Nate, 30.10.2008

"Sadly, photos are all that exist now as the last remaining protype was destroyed."

Not true, I have repaired that very helicopter where that picture was taken. At Guthrie Field Ft. Rucker AL She stands tall over all the other abandoned airframes slowly rotting in the Alabama humidity.

FlightDreamz, e-mail, 29.09.2008

"Stingray" the rotors were probably removed for transportation of storage reasons. If you want to see a photo WITH the rotor blades go to http://aeroweb.brooklyn.cuny.edu/database/aircraft/showimage.php?id=14507
Sadly, photos are all that exist now as the last remaining protype was destroyed.

Tyger, 24.02.2008

Never completed.

"STINGRAY", e-mail, 01.02.2007

I DONT SEE ANY ROTOR BLADES, WHY?

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