Martin RB-57F
by last date | by total length | by number


LATEST COMMENTS

20.09.2014 07:47

Junkers Ju 390

20.09.2014 04:15

Halpin Flamingo

20.09.2014 03:00

Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2c

19.09.2014 22:31

De Havilland D.H.82 Tiger Moth

19.09.2014 22:00

Avro 685 York

19.09.2014 16:41

De Havilland D.H.83 Fox Moth

19.09.2014 05:09

Bell P-39 Airacobra

19.09.2014 00:01

Airspeed AS.5 Courier

18.09.2014 22:15

North American T-28 Trojan

18.09.2014 21:37

Convair 240

18.09.2014 13:40

Handley Page H.P.81 Hermes

18.09.2014 04:15

Northrop F-89 Scorpion

17.09.2014 22:08

De Havilland D.H.77

17.09.2014 22:01

De Havilland D.H.75 Hawk Moth

17.09.2014 19:26

Douglas B-23 Dragon

17.09.2014 15:20

Sikorsky S-43 / JRS

17.09.2014 04:47

McDonnell F-101 Voodoo

16.09.2014 23:30

Nakajima Ki-43 "Hayabusa" / "OSCAR"

16.09.2014 15:39

Grumman OV-1 Mohawk

16.09.2014 01:48

De Havilland Canada DHC-5 Buffalo

15.09.2014 22:36

Piper PA-48 Enforcer

15.09.2014 22:27

Douglas X-3 Stiletto

15.09.2014 18:18

Druine (Rollason) D.31 Turbulent

15.09.2014 03:26

Boeing B-50

14.09.2014 19:05

Fairey N10

14.09.2014 05:40

Avro Canada CF-100 Canuck

13.09.2014 15:29

Curtiss Model F

13.09.2014 14:35

Bristol 105 Bulldog

12.09.2014 23:56

Boisavia B.80 Chablis

12.09.2014 14:14

Fokker F.27 Friendship


Clark Wilberg, 03.06.2014 22:05

I was an SEO (Special Equipment Operator) with AFTAC and had the pleasure of working with, and flying with, many of the folks listed in these comments. Gordon Blevins--always enjoyed flying with you on the WC-135; had a few flights on WB-47s and thoroughly enjoyed that aircraft as well; 417 was my favorite! I had the privilege of working with -57F navigators--teaching them the operation of the sampling equipment for their sampling operations.


Joe Devenport, e-mail, 28.05.2014 04:05

For anyone that owns a 58 WRS book: If you can ID anyone in the photos in the sq book, please let us know. contact John Penz or me. Please provide their name, the page and the location on the page, if required. Please use 58 WRS Photos in the subject line. thank you


Joe Devenport, e-mail, 08.05.2014 03:25

Rodney, if you would like to have a model perhaps you can check this web site out. It's aimhigherjets.com. I have seen some of their work and they do good work. They have a 1 800 number, too. I plan to have them make a model for me soon. As for the helmet, they look better displayed, as for a price, I'm not sure you will make more than a few $$. Perhaps, we will see you on Pawn Stars some time. Let me know how you make out with it. good luck.


Rodney Carroll, e-mail, 07.05.2014 16:20

Joe, Thanks for the info. I collect interesting items but this items is a bit large. What I wanted was the RB-57 model. I missed out on that, but I knew the flight helmet was a good deal because I knew what it was related to. I knew about the RB-57 from watching a program of either the History channel or Discovery. I am really into the SR-71 and the U2 missions. I do plan on selling the helmet. That is why I was trying to figure out how it was used.


Joe Devenport, e-mail, 06.05.2014 00:26

Rodney, not all flights required the pressure suits. We also had the C model. I'm sorry to hear about the Col. He was a good man. So, are you a collector of some kind?


Rodney Carroll, e-mail, 03.05.2014 07:11

I recently attended the estate sale of Colonel Gene Durden. I acquired a standard style flight helmet that belonged to him. The helmet has "F-Troop" and "58 WRS" stickers on it. This is not a "Space Helmet" like I see in photos of the pilots of the RB 57F. Was this standard style flight helmet used in the unit? Where they used for maintenance flights. Was there other aircraft in the unit that the Colonel could have been flying?


John Penz, e-mail, 16.12.2013 01:55

Hello all. The 2nd preinting of 10 books is sold out. I have several folks wanting a book, so through the good graces of my neighbor, Joe Herring, owner of Herring Printing in Kerrville, I am going to have 5 more books printed. This will be the last print at the original price, $22 + tax and insured priority mail +/- $5.80, so if you or one of your friends want one, let me know hubba-hubba (WWII term). I will be going to press right after the 1st of the year. email me at jrpenz@windstream.net
Merry Christmas and a Happy healthy New Year. JP


john holbein, e-mail, 01.11.2013 02:20

I was stationed at Kirkland 1962-1965 crewed 837 (short wing)& then 292 rb57f when delivered.Spent time at Johnston atoll'indian springs nev. & Fairbanks.I was there when capt lafoon & maj parr (sadly crashed)I also remember maj red cambell.That was a wonderful time in my life;tw0 of my kids were born there.Chief gullo was the top enlisted man then;I still keep in touch with a few of the guys'nottingham'pastore'I also remember Cassidy he crewed one of the D-models.best regards to all


Jeff Powers, e-mail, 17.08.2013 03:34

My great uncle, MSG John Supple, helped to develop this beautiful aircraft while working at General Dynamics in Ft. Worth. I still have his "official" Model of the plane as well as his zippo lighter that has the RB-57F Silhouette on it.


Gordon Blevins, e-mail, 22.06.2013 02:29

I flew the "F" while stationed at Kirtland AFB, NM. I was also the safety officer and part of the accident investigation team for the 292 accident. Of all the airplanes that I flew, the "F" was my favorite. The WC-135B and the WB-47 (my e-mail address is the tail number of the last WB-47E Bob Sprecher, Curt Norden, and I took to the "Bone Yard" at Davis-Monthan. I also took two of the RB-57F's there. THis was/still is I guess (Yea NASA) a fantastic airplane. Hello to those of you who left comments here whom I know!!


Lester Johns, e-mail, 18.04.2013 22:03

I found these articles while I was looking for a good desktop pic. I was at Rhine Main when the first (F) arrived and until after when we had lost one in the Black Sea. The squadron must have disbanded not too long after I left. It was an awesome aircraft for sure. I can't say what the mission was or my job. I was told to forget, although I have seen articles talking about it since.


CMSgt (ret), e-mail, 06.03.2013 07:44

Earler I posted my email address wrong. This is to be corrected copy. Anyone wishing to contact me please use this addres: jrpenz@windstream.net Anyone know the address of Dan Templeton,lease give me or h the address above. Thanks for you help in advance
John R. Penz


John Penz, CMSgt ret, e-mail, 24.02.2013 06:04

The F was and still is a most beautiful plane to watch take off and go almost straight up. NASA still has 3 of our planes in their stable (295 renumbered 927 is going through it's final stage of a ramp to ertical stabilzer will be virtually a new aircraft when it is flown to Ellington ready to go to work.If anyone is interested in purcasing repr\\int of the 1974 Squadron book, I have 6 left. These books will be sold for $30 each incuding insured Priority USPS mail. I will be bringing them (if left) to this year's reunion in Branson. MO in June and will wave the postage and handling charge for direct delivery. Chief Snelson (ret) and I have had approximately 100 new patches direct copies of the RB-57F Black ball Patch, the RB57F patch a d the WB-57F patch both in true colors.See post number 2 in this link for prices. These are being sold as a non-profit venture.CMSgt John R Penz,email jrpenz@windstream.net


Joe Devenport, e-mail, 31.01.2013 02:27

Hello fellow F troops
I was in the 58 WRS from Jan 69 go Aug 72. I didn't know it at the time but the 58 was the best SQ ever with a bunch of good guys. I got out and worked in the Gulf of Mexico for while, made good money at that time. I came back in 2 years later became a flight engineer on C5s and loved it! I remember Basil, E Cook, R Cook, Mike Hong, Wooler, Step, Harroll, Pride, McKey and Short, plus several others. Currently, I live in Oklahoma. I was forced to retire two years ago, the company I worked for lost the contract and my job was done away with. I can't say that I'm broken up about it, I help out around town, church and work in my wood shop and visit family often.


CMSGT John R. Penz, e-mail, 24.12.2012 07:00

Hi FTroopers all. I must say that the squadron book sale went quite well after the word got out. Matter of fact 2 troops requested books after they were all gone. So I put myself in the hole again and ordered 10 more copies and now have 8 left. The price is $22.00 for the book and priority mail and insurance will total $30.00 if you want one, contact me at jpenz@windstream.net.
CMS ret John Snelson came up with a suggestion that maybe their are some folks out there that might like a brand new patch. He and I have put up the front $ so he and I have a limited number of 3 different patches. First was the "Black Ball" patch which I wore from '64- 65/66. The 2nd was the familiar RB57F patch, and the third was the WB57F patch.The "Black ball"patch is $3.00 plus shipping and handling, the other 2 patches will be $4.00each. These patches are true copies of the original. If you are interested emaIl me at jpenx@windstream.net and I will email pictures of the patches.


Curtis D. Dale, e-mail, 29.11.2012 11:11

I flew in the "Longwing" from Albuquerque for 1968 to 1972. I was Chief Navigator, Chief of Command Post, and Special Assistant to Commander during the period of Don Wolf, Doug Campbell, (and, UGH, Click Smith).It was a wonderful assignnment and airplane, in many ways the ultimate flying assignment of my flying career, even though all the others were terrific. The 58ths was a collection of the finest crews, maintenance, life support, flight surgeons, and civilian tech reps that could possibly be put together. it was my honor to fly with such people Dana Kelly, Vern Duenas, Leroy Gray, Doug "Red Dog" Campbell, Don Wolfe, Ed Wolf, Earl Heal, Gene Durden, Sam Van Dyke and so many other great pilots and to lead the finest collection of navigator/mission director/special equipment operators that could possibly be assembled. These GIBs were able to do what you asked of them, every time, to the very extent the equipment provided was capable of doing. I saw times when their equipment failed, and their innovations still gathered incredibly valuable information, matching or exceeding what the failed equipment provided by the customer was designed to do. Greg Korczak, Rich Wojick, Jack Booth, Larry Champion, Norm Bockledge, and so many others have become legends to me. Flew them out of Albuquerque, Panama, Mendoza Argentina, Alaska and Hawaii. Colonel Curtis D. Dale, PhD, USAF (Ret)


RICH, e-mail, 26.10.2012 11:38

I was station at Yokota Air base from 1966 to 1968. There were RB-57F's assigned to the 56 WRS and 6091st RS. I worked on the EB-57E's that shared the hanger with the 6091st RB_57F's. There is not much information on their mission in the 60's and I guess it will be lost to history.


Emmet Cook, e-mail, 26.09.2012 01:26

I was in the 58th from 69 to 72. I worked for Chief Houghton in the Flt Line office for a year and then as a asst Crew Chief on 3295, and then Crew Chief for about a year. After that I went to Docks until I got out in Aug of 72. I went TDY to Alaska, Panama, and Mendoza several times. Loved Panama and Mendoza. In Mendoza I got a back seat ride in a F model. That was a great day. After I got out I went to college on the GI Bill and graduated in 1975 and took a commission and retired as a LTC in the Army in 1995. I am now retired in San Antonio. I remember Denis Davis, Gary Christian, Joe Devenport, Jim Janeway, Dale Heath, Paul Walton, Frank Marguez, Pat Horton, Pat Pastori, Don Gasson, John Penz, Mack, Lt Laird and many others. Hope they are all doing well. Happy trails


Tom Hawkins, e-mail, 07.09.2012 22:51

Remember the bar races at the O'club? Frank McCabe seemed to have it figured out. Ken Wetzel walked into the head and thought I was in one of the stalls. He said, boy does it stink in here. As he was washing his hands, Good ole' Colonel Click Smith walked out of the stall and said, "yeah, even mine stinks."


CMSgt ret John R. Penz, e-mail, 13.08.2012 05:00

Hey troops just checking in to see wassup and pass along a little info. Last year I took it upon myself to have the 58th RB57F book reprinted.It was done in a soft cover with all pages done in their original B&W or color. Had a hard time trying to scrape together 40 buyers to get a price of $21.92 + S&H.It was definitely a NOT-FOR- PROFIT undertaing but wound up I think quite successful. I included with the book a cd of the whole book, a cd given to me by NASA JSC with the history of the Longwing at NASA and the 1965/66 Cristmas Card with the F&C inflight together all for only $27.60 which included Priority USPS Mail. I only made the quota with the good graces of several individuals purchasing several copies and donating them to various USAF Museums,Max Schuerebrenn donated a copy to the Air Force Academy Library in memory of Capt Tom Walker, KIA Laos, John Snelson and John Penz copy to Pima Air Musuesm, Richard Wojick to the National Museum of the USAF at WPAFB, George Tash donated his hard cover copy to the Kirtland AFB Museum, Mel Burns donated a copy to the Air Force Historical Center at Maxwell AFB,AL, and a copy was donated to the Warner Robins Air Force Museum by Rich Wojick, and I sent a copy to the fols at NASA JSC Houston thaning them for hosting me last year to watch a suit-up and launch of prior # 503. Yes Bubba, NASA is presently flying (2) two "F"s and 295 is undergoing a wheels up complete rebuild in Colorado to go along with her two sisters. 293 is also in Colorado undergoing some sprucing up but doubtful if she will take to the air again, more likely will be a parts donor. Last month 2 people came outm of the woodwork and snatched the last two books I had. Stange part is I now have two more people wanting books so I stepped in the cow patty and ordered 10 more books at the original price, and another 50 Christmas cards, however unless I get a generous soul that will copy my master CDs for me, they will ot be part of the package this time. Office Max burned me last year when I ran out and needed a few more. I am also having some RB57F "Black Ball" patches made but the will only be availabe to book purchasers. The lady doing the embroidery is the granddaughter of one of my former Life Support troops, and she is doing it for me at her cost, so I will definitely not be trying to even break even on these.
Anyone interested in a reunion, a former member of the 58WRS at Eielson and also at Kirtland has been hosting a get to gether ay BRANSON for the past 12 years. We had about a dozen there last year. If you're intersted at:Email CR Layton at: Conradlay@aol.com Great time, great friends, good shows and chow. email me if you or anyone you know want a book. jrp aka FTroopChief


Garry Martin, e-mail, 06.06.2012 23:40

Tom Cerny,
This is Garry Martin, do you remember me? Everything you said was true as I was with the 58th from 1964-67 and worked on 288,289,290,291,292,293, 294&295.I was on a TDY at Eilson AFB in Fairbanks Alaska Dec.Mar.1964-65
My home E-Mail is: garmart@camelliacom.com


Garry Martin, e-mail, 06.06.2012 22:27

Other E-Mail: garmart@camelliacom.com.
I forgot to state in my narratice that I was with the 58th WRS, 4300 field, Kirtland AFB from 1964-1967.


Garry Martin, e-mail, 06.06.2012 22:22

Other E-Mail: garmart@camelliacom.com
I noticed that at the top of this page it sayes: Strategic high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft based on B-57 bomber. The first prototype flew in 1966.
I was station at Kirtland AFB, N.M. from Jan. 1964 thru 1967. During that time I was on the maintance crew on the RB-57B & F models. From 1964-67 I was on tail # 289,290,291,292,293,294.
If you are interested;I have photos.


M. L. Shettle, e-mail, 30.05.2012 16:33

When Martin built this aircraft it was Top Secret. All flight testing was done at night.


Steve Patterson, e-mail, 05.03.2012 02:28

Gentleman, I was wondering if any of you had any stories about my father Bob Patterson. I believe he may have flown with Captains Laffon and Lackey out of Kirtland. There are many great memories spending time with the Laffon family on their ranch. My father passed away January 20th, 2009.


GEORGE SUTTON, e-mail, 02.02.2012 20:27

Was a captain/flight medical officer in F-troop 8/66-8/68, the went to UPT at Williams class 70-01 as Major then the Macdill,Takhli, Kunsan, in F-4E'S until leavinf for civvies as MD as an 0-5. Working on a book, more to follow.


Wes Janeway, e-mail, 09.01.2012 09:42

My Grandfather was Tsgt Jimmie Janeway. I have heard many stories about this plane and have lots of pictures of it. He passed away and never got to really talk to people about the missions and things he did or met the people he talked about. If any of you have anythings you would like to share or stories of him please try to contact me. My email is wesjaneway@yahoo.com


Craig Schneider, e-mail, 13.12.2011 19:35

My dad, Maj. Frank Schneider was pilot/maint. officer for the 58th WRS from July '69 to July '70. Lt. Col. Durden was one of his bosses. Loved it there. Wish we could have stayed there longer. Attended Cleveland Jr. High - 8th grade. Where can I get a RB-57F patch? Thanks.


Kyle Laffoon, e-mail, 15.10.2011 03:00

I've seen many comments about the 'F' first being used in '66.
I don't think so. Lester Lackey, of Stepenville Texas, Texas A&M, flew out of Rhine Main in December of 1965. Him and back-seater were taken POW by Soviet Warships after the shot down RB-57 'F' hit the water a distance from Odessa, Ukraine.
And, Yes, the 'F' was mostly made in Ft. Worth. As those in Marietta GA. were lucky to assemble a tail correctly.


phil putnam, e-mail, 26.08.2011 01:27

My father was Lt. Col. Joseph W. Putnam and was in the 1211th and the 58th. He flew out of Avalon AFB in Australia during those years 1962-66. Wonder if you knew him and any stories about those times? Iíve been in contact with quite a few AF buddies that knew and flew with him and am always interested in hearing more.
Thanks
Phil


Will Sutton, e-mail, 23.08.2011 03:37

Spent short period at Holloman AFB NM in '74-'75 on F-4D sims and saw some of these, or some modified, long-winged -57's, flying out of there.


Bill Basile, e-mail, 05.08.2011 00:13

I sure remember Roger Snider---He was my room-mate at Kirtland AFB. I never spent much time in the barracks since I was from Albuquerque. I really lived in downtown Albuquerque with my fiance (now my wife of 42 years). I left the 58th when my enlistment ended (I never thought I was going to live through my military enlistment). I can remember Sgt. Penz telling me that I would probably starve in civilian life (LOL). I guess he was wrong about starving, but I sure didn't end up to be President either. Oh, well, I can honestly say that the one incident I remember most was being so sick one day I did not come to work. I then had to report to Colonel Durden (maybe it was Major Durden)--in any event, he was so nice! However, his Chief Master Sargeant, I forget his name but he told me after meeting the Durden (spelling?) that I did not report to Colonel Durden properly--as if that would have made any difference! That incident taught me that there are those in the military who really care about the troops, and then there are those whose main concern is proper military etiquette (they are, IHMO totally out of it!).

I will never forget doing my part in barracks clean ups!

The other thing I will never forget was Friday, clean-up days--always using floor wax to both strip and wax the floors--I always thought that was pretty crazy!

Roger, if you are still out there--I seemed to always get the Eilson TDY (just as you did) when it was 50 or more below zero!

I can also remember how that TDY that Roger got to Mendoza, Argentina went on and on--I think it was for over 100 days--when that crew got back, the word was put out that TDYs would never again last 100 days, even though the Mendoza TDY was a very profitable one--probably the only one where people got paid more than $1 per day---I still wonder what lunatic in the Pentagon dreamed up the idea of sending troops for TDY at a $1 a day per diem! The Pentagon had to be run (probably as is true now of absolutely crazy MBA-type bean counters!)

In any event, I went back to school--got my Master's at UNM--the University of New Mexico. My wife and I left Albquerque and went north to Denver. I got hired at the Auraria Higher Education Center. I retired from higher education, however, I am a life-long learner! I play recreational softball and enjoy life!!

bill basile


Bill Basile, e-mail, 05.08.2011 00:10

I sure remember Roger Snider---He was my room-mate at Kirtland AFB. I never spent much time in the barracks since I was from Albuquerque. I really lived in downtown Albuquerque with my fiance (now my wife of 42 years). I left the 58th when my enlistment ended (I never thought I was going to live through my military enlistment). I can remember Sgt. Penz telling me that I would probably starve in civilian life (LOL). I guess he was wrong about starving, but I sure didn't end up to be President either. Oh, well, I can honestly say that the one incident I remember most was being so sick one day I did not come to work. I then had to report to Colonel Durden (maybe it was Major Durden)--in any event, he was so nice! However, his Chief Master Sargeant, I forget his name but he told me after meeting the Durden (spelling?) that I did not report to Colonel Durden properly--as if that would have made any difference! That incident taught me that there are those in the military who really care about the troops, and then there are those whose main concern is proper military etiquette (they are, IHMO totally out of it!).

I will never forget doing my part in barracks clean ups!

The other thing I will never forget was Friday, clean-up days--always using floor wax to both strip and wax the floors--I always thought that was pretty crazy!

Roger, if you are still out there--I seemed to always get the Eilson TDY (just as you did) when it was 50 or more below zero!

I can also remember how that TDY that Roger got to Mendoza, Argentina went on and on--I think it was for over 100 days--when that crew got back, the word was put out that TDYs would never again last 100 days, even though the Mendoza TDY was a very profitable one--probably the only one where people got paid more than $1 per day---I still wonder what lunatic in the Pentagon dreamed up the idea of sending troops for TDY at a $1 a day per diem! The Pentagon had to be run (probably as is true now of absolutely crazy MBA-type bean counters!)

In any event, I went back to school--got my Master's at UNM--the University of New Mexico. My wife and I left Albquerque and went north to Denver. I got hired at the Auraria Higher Education Center. I retired from higher education, however, I am a life-long learner! I play recreational softball and enjoy life!!

bill basile


Glenn Wilder, e-mail, 13.05.2011 10:17

I was stationed at Yokota AB Japan 1960 Ė 1961 serving as engine mechanic. My unit was the 3rd Field Maintenance Squadron. We supported the 8th, 13th and 90th Bomb Squadrons, 6091 Recon Squadron. Aircraft were RB57A, and B57B and C models. After Japan I went to 1211 Test Squadron (Sampling), later 58th WRS at Kirtland AFB, Albuquerque, NM from 1961 - 1963. We had RB/WB57B, C and D. Visited Christmas Island and Barberís Point NAS Hawaii. The squadron received the F models after I was discharged. I will never forget the first time I saw a J65 start Ėup.


CMSgt John R. Penz ret, e-mail, 24.04.2011 07:06

I arrived at 58WRS from Iceland, 21 Oct,1964 and assumed Superintendent of Life Support duties. The A/P22s-2 Full Pressure Suits were all over-age hand me downs from ADC and immediately became my biggest challenge. Took some time, a lot of cooperation from MAAMA and 31 damn good troops. I was there until my retirement 1 Sep 1973. I was assigned additional duty of First Term Retention NCO and I'm sure a lot of the younger guys wished I would leave them alone, however I gave them the facts and let them make up their own minds. Called other bases so they could get their base of choice, and the highest bonus allowed. The 58th constantly had the highest reenlistment rate in 9th Weather Wing. Glad to see all the names here, hope everyone reads this: I AM NEGOTIATING A REPRINT OF THE SQUADRON HISTORY BOOK, and prices are dependent on the number of copies ordered. This will be a soft cover edition unless I can get a decent price on a hard cover.
Please email me jpenz@stx.rr.com with any questions and be sure to indicate your desires. I will answer all emails received. Example: 20 books will cost $31+/- each, 75 books are $16+/- each and 100 books are $14.02 each. + S&H.
More are cheaper. Please reply ASAP. This is a non-profit venture. :) John P


deaftom, e-mail, 05.04.2011 19:53

This really should be listed under "General Dynamics" rather than Martin. GD took a B-57 and replaced everything on it except the fuselage, cockpit, horizontal tail, and landing gear. Everything else was totally redesigned, much enlarged, and built from scratch by GD, excepting the engines which were also totally different from the originals. So, both in parts count and in size, the W/RB-57Fs were more General Dynamics than Martin.


Joe Smith, e-mail, 18.03.2011 00:05

My first assignment was to 58WRS, from sometime in 1969 to sometime in the '70s. I left for Southeast Asia from Kirtland. I enjoyed the outfit and remember Lt Col Rothlisberger, Lt Col Durden, Capt. Powers, CMSgt Woods, SSgt Joe Dino, Col Oliver and many others.
God bless you all,
Joe Smith


Roger Snider, e-mail, 26.02.2011 19:46

My first assignment out of basic was the 58th, 68-70.I was a supply troop working in MSL got assigned to 503 than 501. Went to Rhein Main in 69 with 503 using the shuttered 7407th complex. All over the states with 501 for NASA earth resources. I remember my first TDY was to Eilson Alaska it was 67 below in Dec 69. Worked for Msgt Rushing, Lt. Powers, SSgt Lavoie. Many good memories.


Robert Kissel, e-mail, 09.02.2011 00:42

I WAS ASSIGNED TO 6220 CAMROM Yokota AB FROM 65 TO 68. I was an assistant crew chief working for S/Sgt CAVAZOS ON 503. Also station there was Ron shinn,Pete Baily and Dan Boatright. We all went to school on the RB AT KIRTLAND AB


Tom Cerny, e-mail, 06.02.2011 19:16

I don't understand the opening remark of the B57-F prototype first flying in 1966. I was with the 58WRS from 62-June of 65 and was the first crew chief on 288 in early 1965. The TDYs with this outfit were not my fondest memories. The last one I was on there was at Eilson in Fairbanks Al. Nov.Dec.Jan.1964-1965. Yeah right, over Christmas, and most the time in temperatures of arond 60 below zero. Some of the troops were great though. Fred Selders, SGT Yonkers, SGT Stutt,Harry Tipton, Mervin Nephew,Cletus Yingling all come to mind,and there were many more. Before the F model I was crew chief on 850 a B57C


Tom Cerny, e-mail, 06.02.2011 19:16

I don't understand the opening remark of the B57-F prototype first flying in 1966. I was with the 58WRS from 62-June of 65 and was the first crew chief on 288 in early 1965. The TDYs with this outfit were not my fondest memories. The last one I was on there was at Eilson in Fairbanks Al. Nov.Dec.Jan.1964-1965. Yeah right, over Christmas, and most the time in temperatures of arond 60 below zero. Some of the troops were great though. Fred Selders, SGT Yonkers, SGT Stutt,Harry Tipton, Mervin Nephew,Cletus Yingling all come to mind,and there were many more. Before the F model I was crew chief on 850 a B57C


Sherman Willden, e-mail, 27.01.2011 17:22

Whoops, old age hits again. I was at Kirtland from 1970-1976


Sherman Willden, e-mail, 27.01.2011 17:19

I didn't know this site existed and I was glad to find it. I worked with the high-altitude suits from 1970-1984. I really enjoyed the experiences.


Stan Martin, e-mail, 22.01.2011 19:20

I worked on and recovered samples from the sampling system 1962 to 1966. Remember the D model that lost its wing as it was taxing to a parking place clsoe the the 58th hanger at Kirtland. TDY to Alaska, Johnston Island, Washington State, Panama, Indian Springs and Nellis. Loved the F model. It was great to work on and got a back seat ride out of Panama.


Gary Christian, e-mail, 23.12.2010 04:06

KAFB 69-71. Jet Engine Tech. I also remember Doug Southwick. Some of the other engine shop guys were Steve Pence, Mike Buell, Frank Marquez, Last name Castro, Pereira, and Clagett. Colonel Wolfe was squadron commander.


Colonel Curt Dale, PhD, Ret, e-mail, 19.11.2010 07:08

I was in the WB-57F, 58th WRS from 1968 to 1972. It was a marvelous experience. I was the Task Force Alpha Commander at Albrook Air Force Base, Panama for a period, and according to COMAC, General Jack Catton, the first Navigator to command any flying unit in MAC (maybe the AF--no matter!)and he liked the job I was doing and sent a letter of commendation to Col. Doug "Red Dog" Campbell and Col. Don Wolfe. It was a nice touch. It was one of those things that led to me eventually becoming a full colonel. Once, enroute to Panama, we were at 70,100 on my altimeter, and I cross checked it with the pilot. I've had a couple of folks say they got to 71K and another to 72K. Must have been incredibly cold. On one flight from Mendoza, I got down over the Anarctic Peninsula. I flew many missions in it up over the Northern Polar Region adding more to my record of polar missions, since I flew the WB-47E and WC-135 (dual current) in 55WRS, McClellan, and Det 1, 55th WRS, Eielson, as well as the "F" while later on TDY's to Eielson. My total polar missions--178. My North Pole crossings (in WC-135)-87. Hank Brauner, killed over the Trail in a C-130 Specter Bird had 105 North Pole Crossings, and 105 polar missions. So, he held one record and I the other. I did many of the WC-135 missions with him. I recognize many of the names above and some were great friends. I am in contact with many of them on e-mail. I went from there to Vietnam for my third tour. I was Chief of the Command Post for a while in the 58th then Chief Nav for a period until I left for DaNang. It was incredibly good to me. What a group. God Bless all.


j. lloyd, e-mail, 08.08.2010 01:04

Jet engine mechanic, 58th WRS, Dec64-Jul66. RB-57F and C.
I was in the cockpit trimming a J-60. The guy on the ground got too close to the intake. He was sucked up to the intake. His line badge was hanging outside his shirt--the badge was sucked in the intake--one FOD J-60. The trooper survived with bruised ribs.

We also got to participate in an overtemp of a J-65 on a "C" model during a jet-cal. Turbine buckets were flying like hornets from a busted nest--narrowly missing fuel cells. Then we got to go TDY to Panama, Australia and Alaska. Survived to make it to the PI to rebuild P-21s from dinosaur F-100s(from SEA) in 66. Changed AFSC and wound up going to Viet Nam and Thailand helping to chase Ho Chi Minh--worked A-26's and B-66's doing NDI.

Names I remember from KAFB: Sellers, Rios, Southwick, Smith, Anderson, Dingman, Hillsendigger, Gullo, Rogers, Nestoric. My RAM's from the '60's have a lot of blanks.

Chow,

j. Lloyd


Bernie Nordoff, e-mail, 02.05.2010 18:56

I was a back seater in the 58th from 70 to 72. Tom Shull, one of the pilots, told me a 500 series with 2500 lbs of fuel and all 4 engines (110.6% on the 33's) going all out got to 69.9 thousand. It got to 70 but fell back down. The record low temp was -93C or -135F between Panama and the equator.


Michael Schaniel, e-mail, 22.04.2010 09:31

I was with the 7407th from 1961 - 1966, we had RB-57D's serial numbers 963, 970, 972, 974, 975 & 976. They were replaced with the RB-57F's.


Jbaca16@comcast.net, e-mail, 05.04.2010 22:46

I am the photographer/reporter that filmed the aircraft coming down in 1972 over Albuquerque. I wonder if that film still exists somewhere. You can read about this event at www.onlyinnewmexico.blogspot.com


mike huskey, e-mail, 21.03.2010 18:02

I was eng. mec. with the 07th at Rhine Main AB from 67to68when it was disband and have lots of good memories of the long wings and I remember Jim D.I have both patches we used and a few photos of the sq.with RB-57s 500&503.If any of the old 7407th are out there drop me a line some time.


Jim Drummond, e-mail, 16.03.2010 17:29

I was a crew chief @ Rhine Main AB 66-68
We flew 500 503 until the squadron was disbanded in 68
I believe it was 286 that spent the night in our hangar on its way back from Pakistan with wing damage


Ron Pimentel, e-mail, 25.02.2010 23:56

I worked at 58th WRS from 1963 till 1965, in perodic docks was then transfered to vietNam. Marty Martinez and Ralph Iantosca were transfererd with me. We worked on B57's with the 8th bomb squadron and later were transfered to C130's Had a great time at Kirtland with many fond memories. If you want some ariel photos of the RB57F you can find them on google eath at the Air Force boneyard in Arizona. What a sad fate for such a great aircraft. I'm still in contact with Ralph but lost contact with Marty, I last saw him in Viet Nam.


Tom Barrolw, e-mail, 03.02.2010 19:24

I was a Mission Manager (Backseater) for NASA Houston in the WB-57 until about 1982. On an Airstream air sampling mission for the Department of Energy flying out of Panama, Mike Swann and I reached a max altitude of 68100 feet. The airplane (NASA 928) was fitted with J-60 engines and was flying over the equator where the air at altitude was coldest. At that time, it was the highest altitude attained by a '57F by NASA. The ceiling quoted above (82000 feet) is not possible.


Donald A. Brady, e-mail, 04.01.2010 03:45

I worked on the air handling systems from 1969 to 1971. Spent many nights in the copit changing the sampler. Was NCOIC on second shift.Went to Panama , Argentina and Alaska. Loved Panama.


John Newberry, e-mail, 31.12.2009 04:27

I was with the 58th from Mar 62 to Mar 67 then transfered to the 56th WRS. I crewed 291 for 2yrs before going to Job Control. I believe 286 was the lowest tail number. I retired after 28 years. I have a lot of great memories with the 58th and many, many TDY's.


Doug Perry, e-mail, 19.12.2009 18:28

I saw a RB-57F fly low and slow over my house yesterday. Thought it might be a U2 but the wings were too thick. Had no idea what it was so I researched online and found the it to be the RB-57F. I live on the flight path of the Norfolk Naval Air Station. One online source states that they are now used on "geological survey" missions in Afganistan. There were no markings visible from my perspective.


Steve Gulko, e-mail, 16.12.2009 15:47

I was a airframe repairman assigned to Yokota Air Base 65,66,and 67. I was in 6220 Camrom, 41st AD. I was one of the tin benders working on the green birds. 501, 502, and 503. We were not air sampling. I am looking for anyone attached to those a/c at that time. Thank you I am also lookin gfor a picture of the radome art of the big nosed cobra in sunglasses named everette. I helped Bob Brandt paint that on when we were tdy to Thailand


Emmet Cook, e-mail, 16.12.2009 01:28

Hello CMS Davis. I worked for you on the Flight Line. I arrived out of Tech School in Jan 69 and was dischared in Aug 1972. I crewed 295 for about a year before being transferred to Docks. I remember Jim Janeway and Pat Pastori, Chief Houghton. In 2006 Pat Horton, Gary Christian, Frank Marquez and I met in Alq for a reunion. We had a great time and would like to do it again maybe 2011. Would you be interested? After I got out I went back to college and then joined the Army and retired 20 years later as a LTC. Hope to hear from you. I am fully retired and living in San Antonio, Tx.


CMS Denis C Davis (RET), e-mail, 11.12.2009 22:18

I was assigned to the 58th WRS from September 1968-July 1973.My first job was Crew Chief on aircraft 63-13288. Ronald Ray crewed 63-13286. Another Crew Chief I remember were TSt Jimmy Janeway and SSgt Cook. The Maintenance officer was Capt Mike Laird and the Deputy for maintenance was LT Col Gene Durden. Some of the pilots were Capt Clark, Maj Hoffman, Maj Blevins or safety officer, Lt Col Putnam, and Lt Col Raslisbuger. Not sure of the spelling of their names. We nicknamed Maj Hoffman hydraulic Hoffman as we felt he could smell a hydraulic leak from 100 yards. My second job was Dock Chief. Next I worked in Quality Control and was working their when aircraft 63-13292 crashed. We had been having problems with the horizontal stabilizer actuator and we felt we had the problem fixed. When this aircraft dropped from the sky, we began to second guessing our self. By the way, at the same time this aircraft was falling from the sky, a TV camera man was checking out his camera and captured this on film. I was sent to the site and was able to almost rule out the actuator. After the actuator was removed and sent in for inspection it was found to be in good working order. I was at the crash site when I was told by Lt Col Durden that I had orders to go to the 63rd Mil Airlift Support SQ. Kelly Air Force Base TX. Five days latter I was in TX.
If I remember right it was tail number 63-13286 that was returned to the 58th from Pakistan. This aircraft was straddled by two SA-2Guideline missiles as it was descending towards Peshawar.Despite suffering major structural damage and sustaining over 170 holes, the pilot managed to land the aircraft back at Peshawar.
The 58th WRS was like a large family. We had personal TDY all over the world 360 days a year. The Commander almost always returned everyone home at Christmas. When you were TDY some one would always check in with your family to make sure they were okay. We always had a picnic in the summer and a very nice Christmas party. The Christmas of 1969, my wife was expecting our last child and she did not have a dress for the Christmas party. LT Col Durdens wife became aware of this and showed up at our house with some of her dresses. She made over one of her dresses to fit my wife. We went on to have one of the best Christmas parties of our life. I could go on and on about how good this unit was but I think you understand by now.
I spent the last 10 years at Beale A.F.B. working with the SR-71 and U-2/TR-1 aircraft.I retired from Beale A.F.B. in Oct. 1991 with 30 years service in the Air Force.


Tom McLehaney, e-mail, 09.12.2009 20:15

I was stationed at Kirtland AFB in the 58th WRS from 1966 until 1970. Steve, I remember you well, we worked together in the Autopilot shop. Sometime between 1966 and 1970, one of our RB-57F's crashed into the north side of Sandia Mountain while attempting to land at night-I don't remember the tail number but it may have been 292. If I remember correctly, the altimeter was found to be faulty leading the pilot to think he was higher than he actually was. The TDY's were definitely an adventure and we got to see and experience some great places-Argentina, Alaska, Panama and Germany are the one's I remember best.


Ventura Franco, e-mail, 09.12.2009 08:46

I was with the 55th WRS at KMCC and used to assist the turn around of the WB-57F's when they transisted KMCC..
Any you guys members of the (Air Weather Recon Association)AWRA?? if not join really interestig stuff there..AWRA @yahoogroups.com also join the AIr Force Band of Brothers...


USAF - Together We Served


Colin Heatherly, e-mail, 22.11.2009 02:10

The serial numbers were 63-13286 through 63-13302 and 63-13500 through 63-13503 (21 Total) I was an aircraft electrician with the 58th at Kirtland from Oct 69 till May 74 when we deactivated. Best outfit of my Air Force career. Those were the days my friend. Loved the travel and the places we went. Mendoza, Panama, Alaska, just to name a few. 287 was lost before I was a member (somewhere over the black sea Iím told) and 292 was lost just south of Albuquerque while I was a member. I think it was either in 72 of 73. NASA still flies two of them. They fly 63-13503 as NASA 926 and 63-13298 as NASA 928. They were here at Nellis back in August and I got to talk to a few of the crew members and revisit my old airplane. Sure brought back a lot of memories. Still one of the most beautiful aircraft ever.


Bob Svoboda, e-mail, 19.11.2009 19:17

I believe the first tail number was 286. I was stationed at Eielson AFB,AK Det 5/9WRW.


HASSAN, e-mail, 30.10.2009 12:11

I NEED PAKISTAN AIR FORCE RB-57F IMAGE OR INFORMATION


Steve Baker, e-mail, 20.08.2009 08:31

I was also assigned to the 58th WRS at Kirtland from 1965 to 1968. I think you are exactly right about the tail numbers. As I remember it was 287. I worked in the auto-pilot shop. We probably went TDY together to either Panama, Alaska, Argentina, or Samoa. Ring a bell with anyone? sb


Ken Swick, e-mail, 19.06.2009 01:58

The last one flying is operated by NASA at Ellington Field Houston, Texas. I know the sound as the RB-57 before I see it. I live 1 mile from the runway and get to watch this (and many other types) fly diretly overhead on final. What a great place to live!


Stan Martin, e-mail, 28.12.2006 00:15

I was assigned to the 58th WRS, Kirtland AFB when the first General Dynamics B57's were delivered to us. I can't remeber the lowest tail number. I believe it was 287 or 288. I served from 1962 to 1966. I worked on the air sampling equipment.


If you want to send an email just replace '(@)' in the address with '@' !



All the World's Rotorcraft


Virtual Aircraft Museum


Sightseeing in Estonia