Sopwith Aircraft

Sopwith company profile
Virtual Aircraft Museum / United Kingdom / Sopwith  

Sopwith Gun Bus Sopwith Gun Bus

1913

The Gun Bus was essentially a landplane derivative of the S.P.Gn (Sopwith Pusher, gun), a gun-carrying ...

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The original Tabloid appeared in 1913 as a civil two-seater but in the following year ...

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Sopwith Tabloid

1913

Sopwith Tabloid

Sopwith Special / Type C Sopwith Special / Type C

1914

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Sopwith 860

1914

Sopwith 860

Sopwith Schneider Sopwith Schneider

1915

Derived from the Tabloid float seaplane which won the Schneider Trophy contest in April 1914, ...

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Derived from the Schneider single-seat fighter seaplane, the Baby first appeared in September 1915, and differed ...

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Sopwith Baby

1915

Sopwith Baby

Sopwith Pup Sopwith Pup

1916

The Pup or Scout Tractor was Sopwith's follow-up fighter to the 1 1/2-Strutter and got ...

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Said to have been the progenitor of the Fokker Dr.I triplane - and therefore various ...

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Sopwith Triplane

1916

Sopwith Triplane

Sopwith 1 1/2 Strutter Sopwith 1 1/2 Strutter

1916

Deriving its extraordinary appellation from a characteristic arrangement of cabane struts - a name that was initially ...

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The L.R.T.Tr., presumably signifying Long-Range Tractor Triplane, was designed to meet an RFC requirement for a combined ...

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Sopwith L.R.T.Tr.

1916

Sopwith L.R.T.Tr.

Sopwith Camel Sopwith Camel

1917

The Camel is remembered as the most successful British single-seat fighter of World War I ...

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The Sopwith Snipe was the RAF's standard single-seat fighter of the post-World War I period ...

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Sopwith Snipe

1917

Sopwith Snipe

Sopwith Bee Sopwith Bee

1917


Sopwith B.1

1917

Sopwith B.1

Sopwith 5F.1 Dolphin Sopwith 5F.1 Dolphin

1917

Designed to provide the pilot with the best possible view in tactically important directions, the 5F.1 ...

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The prototype Cuckoo torpedo-bomber flew in June 1917 and was powered by a Hispano-Suiza engine. ...

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Sopwith Cuckoo

1917

Sopwith Cuckoo

Sopwith 3F.2 Hippo Sopwith 3F.2 Hippo

1917

Built as a private venture, the Hippo two-seat fighter featured negative wing stagger, the gap between ...

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A fighter-reconnaissance two-seater, the Bulldog was a compact aircraft which, in its initial form as first ...

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Sopwith 2FR.2 Bulldog

1917

Sopwith 2FR.2 Bulldog

Sopwith 2B.2 Rhino Sopwith 2B.2 Rhino

1917


A requirement for an armoured single-seat ground attack fighter was issued to the Sopwith company in January ...

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Sopwith T.F.2 Salamander

1918

Sopwith T.F.2 Salamander

Sopwith Snail Sopwith Snail

1918

In October 1917, the A.B.C. Wasp seven-cylinder radial air-cooled engine was considered to offer much promise, and ...

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Sopwith Buffalo

1918

Sopwith Buffalo

Sopwith Swallow Sopwith Swallow

1918

Utilising an F.1 Camel fuselage mated with a parasol wing, the Swallow single-seat fighter monoplane ...

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The Cobham bomber was the only twin-engined Sopwith of the WWI.

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Sopwith Cobham

1918

Sopwith Cobham

Sopwith Dove Sopwith Dove

1918

Two-seat civilian biplane, only 10 were built.

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The sixth and last prototype of the Snipe was fitted with the 320hp A.B.C. Dragonfly ...

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Sopwith Dragon

1919

Sopwith Dragon

Sopwith Snapper Sopwith Snapper

1919

Designed in parallel with the Snark triplane and similarly intended to meet the requirements of ...

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Despite the fact that, by 1918, the triplane configuration was widely considered as passe for the ...

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Sopwith Snark

1919

Sopwith Snark



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